JRTDD articles into XML files

Dear readers,

I want to announce that you can find #JRTDD articles into XML files which will increase the visibility and probably indexing of our journal.

What is XML?

XML is a file extension for an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file format used to create common information formats and share both the format and the data on the World Wide Web, intranets, and elsewhere using standard ASCII text.

XML is similar to HTML. Both XML and HTML contain markup symbols to describe the contents of a page or file. HTML, however, describes the content of a Web page (mainly text and graphic images) only in terms of how it is to be displayed and interacted with. For example, the letter “p” placed within markup tags starts a new paragraph.

XML describes the content in terms of what data is being described. For example, the word “phonenum” placed within markup tags could indicate that the data that followed was a phone number. An XML file can be processed purely as data by a program or it can be stored with similar data on another computer or it can be displayed, like an HTML file. For example, depending on how the application in the receiving computer wanted to handle the phone number, it could be stored, displayed, or dialed.

You can find articles from Vol.1, Issue 1 in XML here. I would like to say big gratitude to our web administrator @Gjorgji Pop Gjorgjiev for giving us this opportunity.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

How to get your journal indexed

In most cases, the journal’s publisher (where applicable) will arrange the application to any indexing service. They also ensure that the correct communications, permissions, and systems are in place in the event of acceptance.

Your Wiley editorial representative will provide feedback on your journal, so you can estimate the likelihood of acceptance.

There are a range of factors used in when deciding whether to index a journal. It is important that these criteria are met before submitting a journal for coverage.

Examples of criteria used by Thomson Reuters

  • Timeliness of publication: Late or short publication can indicate poor academic reception, and the possibility that the journal will falter in the near future.
  • Quality of peer review: A journal must have a robust peer review system in order to maintain research quality.
  • Distinctiveness of subject area: A journal must have a distinctive aims and scope. Companies like Thomson Reuters want to index titles that cause a redundancy or unnecessary addition. You have to show how your title will enrich the database.
  • Internationality: Unless a journal is regional, you should try to reflect geographical diversity of the subject area in your authors and editorial board.
  • Number of citations: Journals are often rejected because of low citation levels in their category. This may because a journal is largely uncited, because its main competitors are not indexed and there is no record of articles that cite the journal.

Source: https://authorservices.wiley.com

What is BASE?

BASE is one of the world’s most voluminous search engines especially for academic web resources. BASE provides more than 100 million documents from more than 5,000 sources. You can access the full texts of about 60% of the indexed documents for free (Open Access). BASE is operated by Bielefeld University Library.

We are indexing the metadata of all kinds of academically relevant resources – journals, institutional repositories, digital collections etc. – which provide an OAI interface and use OAI-PMH for providing their contents (see our Golden Rules for Repository Managers and learn more about OAI at the Open Archives Initiative or Wikipedia).

The index is continuously enhanced by integrating further sources (you can suggest a source which is not indexed yet). We are working on several new features like a claiming service for authors within the ORCID DE project.

BASE is a registered OAI service provider. Database managers can integrate the BASE index into their local infrastructure (e.g. meta search engines, library catalogues). Further on there are several tools and services for users, database and repository managers.

In comparison to commercial search engines, BASE is charcterised by the following features:

  • Intellectually selected resources
  • Only document servers that comply with the specific requirements of academic quality and relevance are included
  • A data resources inventory provides transparency in the searches
  • Discloses web resources of the “Deep Web”, which are ignored by commercial search engines or get lost in the vast quantity of hits
  • Correction, normalization and enrichment of metadata by means of automated methods
  • The display of search results includes precise bibliographic data
  • Display of access and terms of re-use for a document
  • Several options for sorting the result list
  • “Refine your search result” options (by author, subject, DDC, year of publication, content provider, language, document type, access and terms of re-use)
  • Browsing by DDC (Dewey Decimal Classification), document type, access and terms of re-use / licence.

Source: Bilefeld Academic Search Engine