How satisfaction and self-efficacy for inclusive education matter for Swedish special educators’ assessment practices of students with intellectual disability

Monica REICHENBERG1,
Kent LOFGREN2

1Department of Education and special education,
The University of Gothenburg, Sweden
2Department of Education, Umea University, Sweden
E-mail: monica.reichenberg@ped.gu.se
Received: 28-April-2019
Revised: 11-June-2019
Accepted: 24June-2019
Online first: 26-June-2019

Abstract

Introduction:Assessment of learning outcomes is integral to both mainstream and special needs comprehensive schools for students with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, assessment of students with ID poses a challenge both to special educators and their cooperation with mainstream teachers in cases of fully included students with ID with an individualised curriculum.

Objectives: We describe and predict the type of assessment practices Swedish special educators in special needs comprehensive schools use for assessment of students with ID.

Methods: Swedish special educators (n = 148) were recruited using a non-random sample. To analyse our data, we used the item response model. In addition, we analysed special educators’ expected satisfaction with assessments using linear regression and logistic regression.

Results: The study suggests that special educators had the greatest difficulty conducting multiple choice and written assessments. Moreover, the study suggests that satisfaction with assessment and self-efficacy for inclusion matters for predicting types of assessment practice. In addition, the study reports an interaction between job satisfaction for moderately experienced special educators that predicts both types of assessment practice and the special educators’ satisfaction with assessment.

Conclusion: We demonstrate how assessment satisfaction, self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and experience matter for special educators’ assessment of students with ID.

Key words:special educators, intellectual disability, assessment, satisfaction, self-efficacy

Citation: Reichenberg, M., Lofgren, M. How satisfaction and self-efficacy for inclusive education matter for Swedish special educators’ assessment practices of students with intellectual disability. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. https://doi.org/10.26407/2019jrtdd.1.17

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Effect of Use of Instructional Materials on Self-Help Skills of Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Abuja School for The Handicapped, Abuja, Nigeria

Rufus Olanrewaju ADEBISI1,
Jummai E. JERRY2

1Department of Communication & Behaviour Disorders,
Federal College of Education (Special), Oyo State, Nigeria
2Department of Special Education, Faculty of Education,
Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria
E-mail: aderufus2@gmail.com
Received: 27-March-2019
Revised: 29-April-2019
Accepted: 10-May-2019
Online first: 13-May-2019

Abstract

Introduction: One role of special education is to increase the functional independence of children receiving services. Practitioners have used systematic instruction to teach academic, social, self-help, recreation/leisure, and vocational skills to different categories of children.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to ascertain the nature of self-help skills of children with intellectual disabilities and to determine the efficacy of instructional materials employed to teach self-help skills to children with intellectual disabilities.

Methods: Using descriptive statistics to analyse the research questions. The researchers purposively and conveniently assigned eight (8) children as participants, diagnosed with intellectual disabilities and have identified deficits in either personal care and hygiene such as teeth brushing, dressing and cleaning of drooling, as identified by the teachers, with three sets of instruments: Ihenacho Cognitive Domain Measurement Profile (ICDMP) and Collection of Materials for Self-Help Skills (CMSKS) to collect data.

Results: The results revealed that there was significant improvement in the ability to use a toothbrush in brushing teeth of the children in the second group and improvement in the experimental group using a toothbrush, the ability to use a handkerchief to clean drooling and ability to use detergent to wash clothes of the children in the second group and improvement in the experimental group using detergent.

Conclusion: The study recommended that teachers and caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities should help in the acquisition of hygiene protection skills and behaviour through training.

Key words: Intellectual Disabilities, Self-Help Skill, Instructional Materials, Self-Management skills, Independence

 

Citation: Adebisi, OR., Jerry, EJ. Effect of Use of Instructional Materials on Self-Help Skills of Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Abuja School for The Handicapped, Abuja, Nigeria. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. https://doi.org/10.26407/2019jrtdd.1.15

Corresponding address:
Rufus Olanrewaju ADEBISI
Department of Communication & Behaviour Disorders,
Federal College of Education (Special) P.M.B. 1089, Oyo. Oyo State, Nigeria.
E-mail: aderufus2@gmail.com