IN MEMORIAM – Prof. Dr. Alexander Poletaev

Dear readers,

With great sadness we want to announce that yesterday on March 6th, 2021 Prof. Dr. Alexander Poletaev died in hospital in Moscow. He was the member of JRTDD Editorial Board. We send condolences to his family for this great person. Here we want to thanks Prof. Poletaev for his contribution as author and reviewer in Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities in almost last three years.

Prof. Dr. Alexander Poletaev was born in Moscow, Russia in 1951. He was a graduate of the 3rd Medical Institute in Moscow (1974), where he later obtained his PhD (1977). He obtained MD degrees in 1988 on the Faculty of Biochemistry of the University of International Friendship in Moscow. He worked as researcher, senior researcher, main researcher in the Res. Inst. of Normal Physiology by name P. K. Anokhin, Moscow; Medical Research Center Immmunculus, Moscow; Federal Research Ctr. of Reanimation and Rehabilitation RAS, Moscow, Russia. His research interests were related to Immunophysiology, Natural autoimmunity, Autism, Immunology of pregnancy and fetal development, Immunobiotechnology, Oncoimmunology. He was member of some International Scientific Society and member of Editorial Board of many international journals. He took a part (as invited speaker, Chairman and co-chairman) in nearly two dozen of International Congresses, conferences and seminars. He was an author of more than 200 articles published in Russian and international journals, handbooks and manuals. He was author more than 10 Patents in field of Biochemistry, Immunology, Biotechnology.

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Call for papers JRTDD Vol.4, Issue 1, 2021

Dear colleagues,

We would like to inform you that issue 2 of the volume 3 of Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities is published online (December 25, 2020). A total number of 7 papers are published. Next Issue 1, Volume 4 of JRTDD for the 2021 year is expected to be published until June 30th, 2021.

Accessing JRTDD Online
To view a current article which appears online, please visit this LINK. 
You, your colleagues, and students will be able to view articles (Full-Text PDF and Online First Full-text PDF) and have unlimited access to the journal (JRTDD is an open access, international, peer reviewed journal).
Citing Articles Using the Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
When citing articles from JRTDD, we encourage you to use article’s DOI in addition to traditional citation information. This is an industry standard, a link-resolving system that allows any link to remain “persistent” even if the location of the article changes at some point in the future. Hence, when you are quoting the link for an article, you should always quote the DOI rather than the URL of our home page.
Useful Online Features for Authors
Your registration in online submission will enable you with continuous information connected with JRTDD. We encourage you to share publications from JRTDD platform and online registration with your colleagues. You can feel free to share every publication on social media.
We invite you to the content of the JRTDD and we think that you will consider publishing with Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities.

Call for papers for Vol.4, Issue 1 is open until January 31st.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to

  • ReAttach Therapy,
  • Neuropsychological Research,
  • Medical Aspects of Disability,
  • Special Education Research,
  • Rehabilitation Research,
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders,
  • Social Aspects of Disability,
  • Master theses and PhD theses in the field,
  • Book Reviews in the field.

If you have any questions or you face problems with paper submission, please feel free to contact us: journaljrtdd@gmail.com

Thank you for choosing #JRTDD for your publications!

Happy New Year 2021!

2021 JRTDD happy new year.png

JRTDD Editor-in-Chief
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JRTDD newest issue 2, Volumen 3 for 2020 has already been published

25-December-2020
Dear colleagues and readers,
I would like to inform you that 2nd issue of the 3rd volume of Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities is published online today (December 25th, 2020). A total number of 7 papers are published. Next Issue 1, Vol. 4 of JRTDD for the 2020 is expected to be published until June 30th, 2021.

Accessing JRTDD Online
To view a current articles which appears online, please visit this LINK.
You, your colleagues, and students will be able to view articles (Full-Text PDF and Online First Full-text PDF) and have unlimited access to the journal (JRTDD is an open access, international, peer reviewed and non for profit journal).
Citing Articles Using the Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
When citing articles from JRTDD, we encourage you to use article’s DOI in addition to traditional citation information. This is an industry standard, a link-resolving system that allows any link to remain “persistent” even if the location of the article changes at some point in the future. Hence, when you are quoting the link for an article, you should always quote the DOI rather than the URL of our home page.
Useful Online Features for Authors
Your registration in online submission (http://jrtdd.com/submit-your-manuscript/) will enable you with continuous information connected with JRTDD. We encourage you to share publications from JRTDD platform and online registration with your colleagues. You can feel free to share every publication on social media.
We invite you to the content of the JRTDD and we think that you will consider publishing with Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities.

Call for papers for Vol.4, Issue 1 is open until January 31st.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to

  • ReAttach Therapy,
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders,
  • Neuropsychological Research,
  • Medical Aspects of Disability,
  • Special Education Research,
  • Rehabilitation Research,
  • Social Aspects of Disability,
  • Master theses and PhD theses in the field,
  • Book Reviews in the field.

If you have any questions or you face problems with paper submission, please feel free to contact us: journaljrtdd@gmail.com

Cheers,

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

 

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Study for Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia

CAREGIVER BURDEN, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG CAREGIVERS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND DEMENTIA

Be a part of a research study investigating experiences and quality of life among caregivers of individuals with both intellectual and/or developmental disabilities and dementia. The purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of caregivers and caregivers’ quality of life. To be included, you must be over 18 years of age and a caregiver of an individual with both an intellectual disability AND dementia.
If you meet this criteria, you are eligible to participate in this study. Interested participants will be entered into a raffle to receive a $20 gift card. The study will be conducted using an online survey. For interested participants, a follow up interview may be conducted over the phone
or in-person to obtain more information regarding the experiences and family quality of life.
If you are interested in participating, please Visit the following link:
https://caregiving.sjc1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0OFUQ21INkXb6br
Or contact:
Dr. Christina Marsack-Topolewski
Assistant Professor, Eastern Michigan University
Ctopole1@emich.edu

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IN MEMORIAM Gjorgji Pop Gjorgjiev 1984-2020

Resepcted readers,

We are very sad to announce that on October 23, 2020, in the early morning hours, our web administrator Gjorgji Pop Gjorgjiev died at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases in Skopje, after a short illness. He was born in Berovo, Macedonia in 1984. He was the web support specialist of the Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation in the period 2014-2017. He has been a web support specialist to the Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversity since its inception in April 2018. During all this time he invested very enthusiastically and selflessly in the growth of the journal. We spent many hours together working on this journal. His family and our journal lost a lot with his untimely death.
Rest in peace my dear colleague and friend!

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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3 Steps to Ensure Your Journal Receives Punctual Peer Reviews

Journal editors spend much of their time working to build out a network of possible peer reviewers for new submissions. It can be difficult to find scholars within a journal’s subject area, especially for niche publications, who are able and willing to provide regular peer reviews. As a result, most editors are constantly on the hunt for new reviewers. After searching for and securing reviewers for a manuscript, the last situation that an editor wants to be in is having one or more of those reviewers go silent.

Unresponsive reviewers can cause significant delays in a journal’s time to publication, creating stress for editors trying to get out their next issue on time and frustrating authors who are hoping to get a decision as soon as possible. What can editors do to avoid sending review assignments and hearing crickets? It can be difficult to predict whether a reviewer might become unresponsive. However, there are ways for editors to try to avoid such situations. Below we outline 3 steps you can take.

1. Check your journal’s past reviewer data before sending a review request

As you build out a reviewer database for your journal, one of the best things you can do to ensure timely reviews is to keep track of all your journal’s past reviewer activity. This can most easily be achieved via peer review software. Many systems, like Scholastica, will automatically track your journal’s reviewer activity with no added work on your part. However, if you’re not yet using a peer review system you can start tracking some reviewer stats in a spreadsheet.

Among the primary reviewer stats your journal should track are:

  • Average days for completing a review assignment
  • Pending review requests from your journal
  • Currently late reviews
  • Number of completed reviews

From the above stats you can start to glean insights into which reviewers you should reach out to and which you may want to wait on or even remove from your list. If you find that a reviewer already has a late or pending review, you’ll quickly know not to reach out to them until those assignments are addressed. Conversely, if you find that a reviewer has completed one or more reviews in a timely manner and has not declined a review invitation recently, that reviewer is likely a good candidate to contact.

Keeping a record of reviewer activity is especially important for journals with many editors, a large reviewer pool, or both. If you have multiple editors pulling from the same reviewer list without any log of reviewer activity, you’re likely to encounter more attrition in review requests because there will be a higher likelihood of editors reaching out to the same go-to reviewers too frequently and potentially turning them off from working with your journal. Even for journals with one managing editor selecting reviewers, it’s unlikely that, that editor will be able to recall each reviewer’s history with the journal off hand. Having a place for the managing editor to find reviewer data will help them avoid spending hours searching through email chains to figure out when a reviewer was last contacted and how they responded.

In order to ensure consistent data, editors should aim to incorporate peer reviewer tracking into their workflows as seamlessly as possible. The more manual steps you have to take to track reviewer activity, the more likely your editors will be to forget steps, leading to incomplete or inaccurate data. With the right peer review software, you can track reviewer activity without adding any extra steps for your team. For example, editors using Scholastica enable automatic reviewer activity tracking as soon as they invite reviewers to their journal via our system.

2. Have a set peer review timeline

Once editors have identified reviewers to reach out to, one of the most tasking parts of the peer review process can be waiting for them to acknowledge and respond to the review request. Review requests can sometimes get buried in scholars’ inboxes leading to days or even weeks of delay before they send a reply.

In order to avoid extensive wait times for reviewers to reply to invitations, one of the best things editorial teams can do is develop an established timeline for review requests. The timeline should account for one or more review reminders sent at designated times and then a final cutoff point for the reviewer to either respond to the invitation or be assumed unavailable.

Dianne Dixon, Managing Editor of International Journal of Radiation Biology piloted this approach to review requests and has seen great success. Her journal’s timeline includes sending an initial review request, sending a reminder four days later, sending a final reminder four days after that, and then finally removing the reviewer from the list after letting them know that she realizes they are likely unable to accept. In this closing email, Dixon asks reviewers to please let her know if they find they are able to review the manuscript. She said using this series of emails with a cutoff point for review responses has decreased delays in her journal’s peer review process.

3. Use automated reviewer reminders

After reviewers have accepted an assignment and agreed to a review deadline, it’s important for editors to periodically check in with them to ensure the review doesn’t fall off their radar. One of the best ways to do this is to send reminder emails at regular intervals.

Editors can try to block out time in their schedules to send review reminder emails, but with so many tasks to keep track of this can often become a bit of a chore. This is another area where peer review software can step in. Many software systems will enable editors to set up automatic weekly or bi-weekly reviewer assignment reminders, which editors can schedule to start sending as the assignment deadline approaches. It’s also a good idea to set up automatic late review reminder emails, that way journals can know late reviewers will be contacted as soon as they miss an assignment – possibly before the assigned editor even realizes.

Despite automation sometimes connoting a sense of detachment, it’s important for editors to consider how automated emails can actually help make journal communication more personal. Automated review reminders help journals stay in constant contact with reviewers and free up editors’ time for sending more thorough responses to specific reviewer questions among other benefits.

Overall emphasize the importance of reviewer communication

There is always the chance that a reviewer will accept an assignment with every intention of completing it on time but then become preoccupied with other obligations and fall behind on their deadline. Such cases are unpredictable for both the journal and reviewers.

Often when reviewers suddenly become unresponsive, the situation can be solved by encouraging reviewers to communicate if their circumstances have changed. Reviewers may be hesitant to go back on their promise, so it’s important for editors to remind them that in cases where they simply can’t complete an assignment on time the best course of action is to make that known.

The Committee on Publication Ethics’ (COPE) “Ethical Guidelines for Peer Reviewers“ stresses the importance of reviewers acknowledging if they are no longer able to complete an assignment. It states that reviewers should “always inform the journal promptly if your circumstances change and you cannot fulfill your original agreement or if you require an extension.” Journals can point reviewers to these guidelines or simply remind them in review requests that the journal encourages reviewer updates, even if it means reviewers having to decline an invitation they previously accepted.

Source: Scholastica

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Share, cite, mention, link JRTDD articles

Dear readers and potential authors,

As you already knew we released the newest Issue 3, Volume 1 at July 5th and you can find it here. I want to stress your attention on the importance of social media in scientific publishing. There are some scientific articles which show that papers which are sharedmentioned, linked on social media such us: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Mendeley, Research Gate, Academia.edu and others are more cited papers than those which are not. I hope all of you have at least one profile on these social media. I would like to ask you to do that with your papers published previously in our Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. On the right menu of our web site you can find social media buttons and you can do that very easily. You should go to some article which is your favorite and then share it or link it. It will take you less than one minute.

With this, you will increase the visibility of JRTDD papers and possibility to be cited by other authors. Also the journal will increase its visibility and international impact in the field of reattach therapy, developmental diversities and rehabilitation sciences as well.

Also, I hope that you will find an interest in submitting some paper in JRTDD in near future. Hoping that it would not be a problem for you, I am sending to you warm regards.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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Experiences of Family Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia

Christina N. MARSACK-TOPOLEWSKI1,
Anna M. BRADY2

1Eastern Michigan University College of Health and Human Services,
School of Social Work, Michigan, USA
2Erskine College, Special Education Department, South Carolina, USA
E-mail: ctopole1@emich.edu
Received: 04-May-2020
Revised: 28-May-2020
Accepted: 02-June-2020
Online first: 03-June-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Dementia poses a number of impairments in cognitive functioning impacting everyday operational tasks and functions. Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) may experience dementia earlier and at a greater rate than the general population. Dementia can pose complex challenges for individuals with ID and their caregivers.

Aim: A qualitative phenomenological study was used to examine the lived experiences of caregivers of individuals diagnosed with both ID and dementia.

Method: Individual interviews were conducted among six participants, who were all family caregivers of individuals diagnosed with both ID and dementia.

Results: Based on the results from the content analysis of interview responses, four themes emerged: (a) difficulty getting a dementia diagnosis, (b) barriers to obtaining services, (c) caregiving realities and challenges, and (d) rewards of caregiving.

Implications for Practice: To support caregivers, practitioners should be adequately trained on this dual diagnosis to assess the support needs in helping caregivers obtain adequate services.

Conclusion: As individuals with ID continue to live longer and age, many will experience dementia. Caregivers of individuals with ID and dementia are often an overlooked, vulnerable population. Practitioners should be aware of their needs in order to provide adequate support to this caregiving population and individuals with ID and dementia.

Key words: caregiving, dementia, intellectual disability, developmental disabilities

Citation: Marsack-Topolewski, N. C., Brady, M. A. Experiences of Family Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):54-64. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.29

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Effect of auditory training intervention on auditory perception problem of children with perceptual disorders in Nigeria

Patricia KWALZOOM LONGPOE
Department of Special Education & Rehabilitation Sciences
University of Jos, Jos. Nigeria
E-mail: atinuola70@gmail.com
Received: 20-March-2020
Revised: 17-April-2020
Accepted: 22-April-2020
Online first: 23-April-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Perceptual disorders are a broad group of disturbances or dysfunctions of the central nervous system that interfere with the conscious mental recognition of sensory stimuli. Such conditions are caused by lesions of specific sites in the cerebral cortex that may result from any illness or trauma affecting the brain at any age or stage of development.

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to find and establish the effect of auditory training intervention on the auditory perception problems of children with perceptual disorders in Alheri Special School, Yangoji, Kwali Abuja, Nigeria.

Methods: This study adopted quasi-experimental design. Specifically, the Case Study Report is applied in this study, with two (2) children identified with perceptual disorders as participants for the study. Two set of instruments were adapted and validated.

Results: The results of the study revealed that auditory perception of child A and B at pre-test are significantly low, and an increase in the levels of auditory perception were recorded for the two children post-test. The findings also showed the extent of which auditory training improves auditory discrimination, awareness, figure-ground, memory and auditory blending of children with perceptual disorders.

Conclusion: The study concluded that children with perceptual disorders who have auditory perceptual disorders have improved in their auditory perception, and there is need for more auditory training therapy for children with perceptual disorders. The study recommended that teachers and professionals should develop a positive attitude towards auditory training therapy for children with perceptual disorders.

Key words: Perceptual Disorders, Auditory Perception, Auditory Training

Citation: Kwalzoom Longopoe P. Effect of auditory training intervention on auditory perception problem of children with perceptual disorders in Nigeria. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):42-53. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.27

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