IN MEMORIAM Gjorgji Pop Gjorgjiev 1984-2020

Resepcted readers,

We are very sad to announce that on October 23, 2020, in the early morning hours, our web administrator Gjorgji Pop Gjorgjiev died at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases in Skopje, after a short illness. He was born in Berovo, Macedonia in 1984. He was the web support specialist of the Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation in the period 2014-2017. He has been a web support specialist to the Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversity since its inception in April 2018. During all this time he invested very enthusiastically and selflessly in the growth of the journal. We spent many hours together working on this journal. His family and our journal lost a lot with his untimely death.
Rest in peace my dear colleague and friend!

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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3 Steps to Ensure Your Journal Receives Punctual Peer Reviews

Journal editors spend much of their time working to build out a network of possible peer reviewers for new submissions. It can be difficult to find scholars within a journal’s subject area, especially for niche publications, who are able and willing to provide regular peer reviews. As a result, most editors are constantly on the hunt for new reviewers. After searching for and securing reviewers for a manuscript, the last situation that an editor wants to be in is having one or more of those reviewers go silent.

Unresponsive reviewers can cause significant delays in a journal’s time to publication, creating stress for editors trying to get out their next issue on time and frustrating authors who are hoping to get a decision as soon as possible. What can editors do to avoid sending review assignments and hearing crickets? It can be difficult to predict whether a reviewer might become unresponsive. However, there are ways for editors to try to avoid such situations. Below we outline 3 steps you can take.

1. Check your journal’s past reviewer data before sending a review request

As you build out a reviewer database for your journal, one of the best things you can do to ensure timely reviews is to keep track of all your journal’s past reviewer activity. This can most easily be achieved via peer review software. Many systems, like Scholastica, will automatically track your journal’s reviewer activity with no added work on your part. However, if you’re not yet using a peer review system you can start tracking some reviewer stats in a spreadsheet.

Among the primary reviewer stats your journal should track are:

  • Average days for completing a review assignment
  • Pending review requests from your journal
  • Currently late reviews
  • Number of completed reviews

From the above stats you can start to glean insights into which reviewers you should reach out to and which you may want to wait on or even remove from your list. If you find that a reviewer already has a late or pending review, you’ll quickly know not to reach out to them until those assignments are addressed. Conversely, if you find that a reviewer has completed one or more reviews in a timely manner and has not declined a review invitation recently, that reviewer is likely a good candidate to contact.

Keeping a record of reviewer activity is especially important for journals with many editors, a large reviewer pool, or both. If you have multiple editors pulling from the same reviewer list without any log of reviewer activity, you’re likely to encounter more attrition in review requests because there will be a higher likelihood of editors reaching out to the same go-to reviewers too frequently and potentially turning them off from working with your journal. Even for journals with one managing editor selecting reviewers, it’s unlikely that, that editor will be able to recall each reviewer’s history with the journal off hand. Having a place for the managing editor to find reviewer data will help them avoid spending hours searching through email chains to figure out when a reviewer was last contacted and how they responded.

In order to ensure consistent data, editors should aim to incorporate peer reviewer tracking into their workflows as seamlessly as possible. The more manual steps you have to take to track reviewer activity, the more likely your editors will be to forget steps, leading to incomplete or inaccurate data. With the right peer review software, you can track reviewer activity without adding any extra steps for your team. For example, editors using Scholastica enable automatic reviewer activity tracking as soon as they invite reviewers to their journal via our system.

2. Have a set peer review timeline

Once editors have identified reviewers to reach out to, one of the most tasking parts of the peer review process can be waiting for them to acknowledge and respond to the review request. Review requests can sometimes get buried in scholars’ inboxes leading to days or even weeks of delay before they send a reply.

In order to avoid extensive wait times for reviewers to reply to invitations, one of the best things editorial teams can do is develop an established timeline for review requests. The timeline should account for one or more review reminders sent at designated times and then a final cutoff point for the reviewer to either respond to the invitation or be assumed unavailable.

Dianne Dixon, Managing Editor of International Journal of Radiation Biology piloted this approach to review requests and has seen great success. Her journal’s timeline includes sending an initial review request, sending a reminder four days later, sending a final reminder four days after that, and then finally removing the reviewer from the list after letting them know that she realizes they are likely unable to accept. In this closing email, Dixon asks reviewers to please let her know if they find they are able to review the manuscript. She said using this series of emails with a cutoff point for review responses has decreased delays in her journal’s peer review process.

3. Use automated reviewer reminders

After reviewers have accepted an assignment and agreed to a review deadline, it’s important for editors to periodically check in with them to ensure the review doesn’t fall off their radar. One of the best ways to do this is to send reminder emails at regular intervals.

Editors can try to block out time in their schedules to send review reminder emails, but with so many tasks to keep track of this can often become a bit of a chore. This is another area where peer review software can step in. Many software systems will enable editors to set up automatic weekly or bi-weekly reviewer assignment reminders, which editors can schedule to start sending as the assignment deadline approaches. It’s also a good idea to set up automatic late review reminder emails, that way journals can know late reviewers will be contacted as soon as they miss an assignment – possibly before the assigned editor even realizes.

Despite automation sometimes connoting a sense of detachment, it’s important for editors to consider how automated emails can actually help make journal communication more personal. Automated review reminders help journals stay in constant contact with reviewers and free up editors’ time for sending more thorough responses to specific reviewer questions among other benefits.

Overall emphasize the importance of reviewer communication

There is always the chance that a reviewer will accept an assignment with every intention of completing it on time but then become preoccupied with other obligations and fall behind on their deadline. Such cases are unpredictable for both the journal and reviewers.

Often when reviewers suddenly become unresponsive, the situation can be solved by encouraging reviewers to communicate if their circumstances have changed. Reviewers may be hesitant to go back on their promise, so it’s important for editors to remind them that in cases where they simply can’t complete an assignment on time the best course of action is to make that known.

The Committee on Publication Ethics’ (COPE) “Ethical Guidelines for Peer Reviewers“ stresses the importance of reviewers acknowledging if they are no longer able to complete an assignment. It states that reviewers should “always inform the journal promptly if your circumstances change and you cannot fulfill your original agreement or if you require an extension.” Journals can point reviewers to these guidelines or simply remind them in review requests that the journal encourages reviewer updates, even if it means reviewers having to decline an invitation they previously accepted.

Source: Scholastica

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Share, cite, mention, link JRTDD articles

Dear readers and potential authors,

As you already knew we released the newest Issue 3, Volume 1 at July 5th and you can find it here. I want to stress your attention on the importance of social media in scientific publishing. There are some scientific articles which show that papers which are sharedmentioned, linked on social media such us: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Mendeley, Research Gate, Academia.edu and others are more cited papers than those which are not. I hope all of you have at least one profile on these social media. I would like to ask you to do that with your papers published previously in our Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. On the right menu of our web site you can find social media buttons and you can do that very easily. You should go to some article which is your favorite and then share it or link it. It will take you less than one minute.

With this, you will increase the visibility of JRTDD papers and possibility to be cited by other authors. Also the journal will increase its visibility and international impact in the field of reattach therapy, developmental diversities and rehabilitation sciences as well.

Also, I hope that you will find an interest in submitting some paper in JRTDD in near future. Hoping that it would not be a problem for you, I am sending to you warm regards.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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Experiences of Family Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia

Christina N. MARSACK-TOPOLEWSKI1,
Anna M. BRADY2

1Eastern Michigan University College of Health and Human Services,
School of Social Work, Michigan, USA
2Erskine College, Special Education Department, South Carolina, USA
E-mail: ctopole1@emich.edu
Received: 04-May-2020
Revised: 28-May-2020
Accepted: 02-June-2020
Online first: 03-June-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Dementia poses a number of impairments in cognitive functioning impacting everyday operational tasks and functions. Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) may experience dementia earlier and at a greater rate than the general population. Dementia can pose complex challenges for individuals with ID and their caregivers.

Aim: A qualitative phenomenological study was used to examine the lived experiences of caregivers of individuals diagnosed with both ID and dementia.

Method: Individual interviews were conducted among six participants, who were all family caregivers of individuals diagnosed with both ID and dementia.

Results: Based on the results from the content analysis of interview responses, four themes emerged: (a) difficulty getting a dementia diagnosis, (b) barriers to obtaining services, (c) caregiving realities and challenges, and (d) rewards of caregiving.

Implications for Practice: To support caregivers, practitioners should be adequately trained on this dual diagnosis to assess the support needs in helping caregivers obtain adequate services.

Conclusion: As individuals with ID continue to live longer and age, many will experience dementia. Caregivers of individuals with ID and dementia are often an overlooked, vulnerable population. Practitioners should be aware of their needs in order to provide adequate support to this caregiving population and individuals with ID and dementia.

Key words: caregiving, dementia, intellectual disability, developmental disabilities

Citation: Marsack-Topolewski, N. C., Brady, M. A. Experiences of Family Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):54-64. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.29

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Effect of auditory training intervention on auditory perception problem of children with perceptual disorders in Nigeria

Patricia KWALZOOM LONGPOE
Department of Special Education & Rehabilitation Sciences
University of Jos, Jos. Nigeria
E-mail: atinuola70@gmail.com
Received: 20-March-2020
Revised: 17-April-2020
Accepted: 22-April-2020
Online first: 23-April-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Perceptual disorders are a broad group of disturbances or dysfunctions of the central nervous system that interfere with the conscious mental recognition of sensory stimuli. Such conditions are caused by lesions of specific sites in the cerebral cortex that may result from any illness or trauma affecting the brain at any age or stage of development.

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to find and establish the effect of auditory training intervention on the auditory perception problems of children with perceptual disorders in Alheri Special School, Yangoji, Kwali Abuja, Nigeria.

Methods: This study adopted quasi-experimental design. Specifically, the Case Study Report is applied in this study, with two (2) children identified with perceptual disorders as participants for the study. Two set of instruments were adapted and validated.

Results: The results of the study revealed that auditory perception of child A and B at pre-test are significantly low, and an increase in the levels of auditory perception were recorded for the two children post-test. The findings also showed the extent of which auditory training improves auditory discrimination, awareness, figure-ground, memory and auditory blending of children with perceptual disorders.

Conclusion: The study concluded that children with perceptual disorders who have auditory perceptual disorders have improved in their auditory perception, and there is need for more auditory training therapy for children with perceptual disorders. The study recommended that teachers and professionals should develop a positive attitude towards auditory training therapy for children with perceptual disorders.

Key words: Perceptual Disorders, Auditory Perception, Auditory Training

Citation: Kwalzoom Longopoe P. Effect of auditory training intervention on auditory perception problem of children with perceptual disorders in Nigeria. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):42-53. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.27

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Dissociative Phenomenology and General Health in Normal Population

Sushma RATHEE1,
Pradeep KUMAR2

1Department of Psychology, Mahrishi Dayanand University,
Rohtak, Haryana, India
2Consultant Psychiatric Social Work, Pt. B.D.S., PGIMS, Rohtak, India
E-mail: sushmaratheecp@gmail.com
Received: 01-June-2020
Revised: 23-June-2020
Accepted: 02-July-2020
Online first: 03-July-2020

Abstract

Background: Dissociative symptoms are most commonly found in females and adolescents, and when discussing their background, they can be from lower socio-economic backgrounds and rural areas. They are always preceded by psychosocial stressors. Dissociative disorders previously known as “hysteria” have been described since antiquity and Hippocrates even hypothesised “wandering uterus” to be the cause for dissociation in females. With the advances in science, there has been shift from these religious and spiritual concepts to a scientific basis for dissociation.

Aim: To assess the dissociative phenomenology in normal population and to assess the subjective health in normal population.

Methods: A group of 100 (50 females & 50 males) were selected from the community using a snowball sampling technique.

Tools: Socio-demographic data sheet, General Health Questionnaire-12 and Dissociative Experience Scale-II were used.

Results: The study found that females differ from males in the reporting of subjective health rating (X2=5.76, p=0.01) and similar results shown in terms of dissociative phenomenology (X2=67.76, p=0.001).

Discussion: It has been found that only 4% from the female group and 2% from the male group rated their health under the “normal” category. 52% of females and 64% of males were categorised under “mild ill health” and 24% to 26% were in “moderate ill health”, whereas 20% of female participants and 8% of male participants rated their health as “severely ill”. In another domain of the study, dissociative phenomenology, 32% of female participants reported severe dissociative symptoms and 38% of male participants also showed similar results.

Conclusion: Dissociative disorder significantly affects the population but it is hard to diagnose due to factors such as; cultural factors, socio-economic factors etc. The study shows clearly that dissociative symptoms are found in the general population also.

Key words: Dissociation, Phenomenology, General Health, Disorder, Healthy population

Citation: Rathee, S., Kumar, P. Dissociative Phenomenology and General health in Normal Population. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):34-41. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.32

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AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-ESTEEM LEVELS IN ADULTS AND RETROSPECTIVE REPORTS OF THEIR PEER RELATIONS AND MOTOR SKILLS IN CHILDHOOD

Adella GILL1,
Sophie BRIGSTOCKE1,
Adam GOODY1,2
1Department of Psychology, University of York
2Department of Psychology, Durham University
E-mail: sophie.brigstocke@york.ac.uk
Received: 03-March-2020
Revised: 15-April-2020
Accepted: 28-April-2020
Online first: 29-April-2020

Abstract

Introduction: The association between motor coordination difficulties (a core feature of Developmental Coordination Disorder) and mental health difficulties, such as low self-worth, anxiety and depression is well documented. This study extends existing research by exploring whether this association is mediated by factors such as bullying or social inclusion during childhood.

Method: This study used a retrospective design in which 217 adult participants completed an online questionnaire which asked about their motor skills in childhood, recollections of peer relationships in primary school, and their current level of self-esteem.

Results: Participants’ recollections of their motor skills in childhood was strongly associated with their current self-esteem self-rating. This finding is consistent with previous studies. Investigation of this association suggests it was mediated by participants reporting lower feelings of social inclusion in childhood. This suggests that adults who report feeling socially excluded at primary school are at risk of experiencing lower levels of self-esteem in adulthood. Interestingly, no association was revealed between low levels of adult self-esteem and recollections of overt bullying in childhood.

Conclusions: This finding, if extended suggests that social exclusion in childhood may be a risk factor for future wellbeing and self-esteem of individuals with difficulties with motor skills. This could have important practical implications, highlighting the importance of initiatives offered within primary schools to support social inclusion, especially for those with motor coordination difficulties. Teachers are well trained on anti-bullying tactics and anti-bullying campaigns are promoted to pupils in many areas. However, it is not clear that the impact of social exclusion, which can be harder to monitor, is highlighted as prominently. Further studies should consider gathering information from children and charting their self-esteem and perceived social inclusion longitudinally.

Key words: Developmental Coordination Disorder, Motor Coordination Difficulties, Bullying, Self Esteem, Social Exclusion, School Peer Relations

Citation: Gill, A., Brigstocke, S., Goody, A. An exploratory study of the association between self-esteem levels in adults and retrospective reports of their peer relations and motor skills in childhood. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):24-33. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.28

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JRTDD Call for papers Vol. 3, Issue 2

Respected colleagues,
We want to announce that ReAttach Therapy International Foundation launched new journal entitled: Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities (JRTDD). JRTDD is a multidisciplinary peer reviewed, international, electronic journal edited by the ReAttach Therapy International Foundation from the Netherlands. The following articles will be considered for publication: original and review articles, short report, letters to the editor, clinical experiences, survey of cases, doctoral dissertations, master of arts, editorials, rapid communications and other contributions from all the fields of reattach therapy, psychology, special education, rehabilitation, social policy, and the related sciences. The aim of the journal is to share and disseminate knowledge between all disciplines that work in the field of developmental disabilities. All articles will be critically reviewed by at least two unknown reviewers within 2 months, but longer delays are sometimes unavoidable. All manuscripts must comply with Authors Instructions. There are around 20 articles published per year. JRTDD allows free access (Open Access) to its contents and permits authors to self-archive final accepted version of the articles on any OAI-compliant institutional / subject-based repository. Journal for ReAttach Therapists and Developmental Diversities is devoted to the scientific study of disability and new schema therapy. The subject matter is broad and includes, but is not restricted to, findings from psychological, biological, educational, genetic, medical, psychiatric, and sociological studies, ethical, philosophical, and legal contributions that increase knowledge on the prevention and treatment of disability, and/or inform public policy and practice.
You are kindly invited to submit an article in our Journal. Please type them in Word format. Please use Times New Roman font with Font size 12. The manuscript can not exceed 20 pages with single paragraph A4 format including Abstract, Tables and Figures. The margins should be 2,5 cm from every side. The style of referencing is according to APA.
You should send the articles electronically via our web site. If there is any problem you can contact us on the following email: journaljrtdd@gmail.com

The dead line for sending the manuscripts is August 31th 2020.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

 

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JRTDD newest issue 1, Volumen 3 for 2020 has already been published

5-July-2020
Dear colleagues and readers,
I would like to inform you that 1st issue of the 3rd volume of Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities is published online today (July 5th, 2020). A total number of 7 papers are published. Next Issue 2, Vol. 3 of JRTDD for the 2020 is expected to be published until December 31th, 2020.

Accessing JRTDD Online
To view a current articles which appears online, please visit this LINK.
You, your colleagues, and students will be able to view articles (Full-Text PDF and Online First Full-text PDF) and have unlimited access to the journal (JRTDD is an open access, international, peer reviewed and non for profit journal).
Citing Articles Using the Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
When citing articles from JRTDD, we encourage you to use article’s DOI in addition to traditional citation information. This is an industry standard, a link-resolving system that allows any link to remain “persistent” even if the location of the article changes at some point in the future. Hence, when you are quoting the link for an article, you should always quote the DOI rather than the URL of our home page.
Useful Online Features for Authors
Your registration in online submission (http://jrtdd.com/submit-your-manuscript/) will enable you with continuous information connected with JRTDD. We encourage you to share publications from JRTDD platform and online registration with your colleagues. You can feel free to share every publication on social media.
We invite you to the content of the JRTDD and we think that you will consider publishing with Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities.

Call for papers for Vol.3, Issue 2 is open until August 31st.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to

  • ReAttach Therapy,
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders,
  • Neuropsychological Research,
  • Medical Aspects of Disability,
  • Special Education Research,
  • Rehabilitation Research,
  • Social Aspects of Disability,
  • Master theses and PhD theses in the field,
  • Book Reviews in the field.

If you have any questions or you face problems with paper submission, please feel free to contact us: journaljrtdd@gmail.com

Cheers,

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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JRTDD 2 years internet campaign

Dear readers,

I want to announce that JRTDD will celebrate 2 years of its existence on April 26th. On this occasion we prepared internet campaign with presentation and lot of images. Also, I will have a webinar regarding our achievements in this period. Here, I want to thank to Andrea our technical secretary for preparing the presentation in Prezi, to our web admin Gjorgji Pop Gjoegjiev for continuous technical support and to our publisher ReAttach Therapy International Foundation for the great financial support.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

 

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