JRTDD indexed in Sherpa Romeo

Dear readers,

I want to inform you that JRTDD is already indexed in Sherpa Romeo.

About Sherpa Romeo

Sherpa Romeo is an online resource that aggregates and presents publisher and journal open access policies from around the world. Every registered publisher or journal held in Romeo is carefully reviewed and analyzed by our specialist team who provide summaries of self-archiving permissions and conditions of rights given to authors on a journal-by-journal basis where possible.

The policy information provided through this service primarily aims to serve the academic research community. Since the service launched over 15 years ago, publisher policies and the open access sector have changed a lot. Open access policy can be complex and varies according to geographical location, the institution, and the various routes to open access — all of which affects how and where you can publish your research.

Source:  https://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/

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JRTDD has been indexed in 20 new databases

Dear readers,

It is my great pleasure to inform you that JRTDD journal has been indexed in 20 new databases all over the world. Mainly it has been indexed in university libraries from Germany, Poland, Denmark, Japan, China, etc. Our journal can be read from lot of countries. Please see all newest indexation in alphabetical order:

  1. Baidu
  2. DTU Findit – Technical Information Center of Denmark, DTU Library
  3. GIGA German of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg
  4. HEBIS, Union Catalog Hesse
  5. Library of Congress
  6. LibrarySearch
  7. Kanazawa University Library
  8. KOBV Berlin – Brandenburg
  9. Kyushu University Library
  10. Max Planck Institute
  11. Polish Scientific Bibliography
  12. Scilit
  13. Simon Fraser University’s electronic journal database
  14. Universitats Bibliothek Ilmenau
  15. Universitat Bibliothek Leipzig 
  16. University Library Goethe University
  17. Warsaw University of Technology Digital Library
  18. Wilday Technical University of Applied Sciences
  19. WZB Berlin Social Science Center
  20. ZDB OPAC Zeitschriftendatenbank

 

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

 

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JRTDD indexed in Federal Science Library – Canada

Dear readers,

It is my pleasure to share with you newest indexation of JRTDD into Federal Science Library – Canada.

What is Federal Science Library- Canada?

The Federal Science Library (FSL) is a one-stop, self-serve portal where you can access library services and search the print collections and repositories of seven science-based departments and agencies from a single place. Wherever possible, departmental publications, reports, data sets and other content are freely available for anyone to access or download.

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JRTDD indexed in WorldWideScience.org

Dear readers,

It is my honor to announce you that JRTDD is indexed in WorldWideScience.org.

What is WorldWideScience.org?

WorldWideScience.org is a global science gateway comprised of national and international scientific databases and portals. WorldWideScience.org accelerates scientific discovery and progress by providing one-stop searching of databases from around the world (Architecture: What is under the Hood). Multilingual WorldWideScience.org provides real-time searching and translation of globally-dispersed multilingual scientific literature.

The WorldWideScience Alliance, a multilateral partnership, consists of participating member countries and provides the governance structure for WorldWideScience.org.

On behalf of the WorldWideScience Alliance, WorldWideScience.org was developed and is maintained by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), an element of the Office of Science within the U.S. Department of Energy. Please contact webmaster@worldwidescience.org if you represent a national or international science database or portal and would like your source searched by WorldWideScience.org.

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JRTDD indexed in HAW Hamburg

Dear readers,

JRTDD has been indexed in HAW Hamburg. What is HAW Hamburg?

Developing sustainable solutions to the societal challenges of today and tomorrow. This is the goal of the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (HAW Hamburg), northern Germany’s leading applied sciences university when it comes to reflective practice. Our central focus is the excellence of our teaching and our degree courses. Simultaneously, HAW Hamburg is continuing to develop its profile as a research university. People from more than 100 countries help make HAW Hamburg what it is, and our diversity is our particular strength.

Source: https://www.haw-hamburg.de/en/university/

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JRTDD has been indexed in Research4Life

Dear readers,

JRTDD has been indexed in Research4Life.

What is Research4Life?

Research4Life is the collective name for five programmes – Hinari, AGORA, OARE, ARDI and GOALI – that provide developing countries with free or low-cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online.

Hinari    

Research4Life is a public-private partnership of WHO, FAO, UNEP, WIPO, ILO, Cornell and Yale Universities, the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers and up to 160 international publisher partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to scholarly, professional and research information.

Since 2002, the five programs – Research for Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE), Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) and Research for Global Justice (GOALI) – have provided researchers at more than 10,000 institutions in over 120 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to up 119,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, applied sciences and legal information.

Source: https://www.research4life.org/about/

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Why having your journals indexed in Google Scholar matters more than ever and steps to get started

If you ask any researcher which online outlets they use to find relevant journal articles, there’s a good chance that Google Scholar will be at the top of their list. The 2018 “How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications“ report found that researchers rated academic search engines as “the most important discovery resource when searching for journal articles,” and Google Scholar is among the most widely used free academic search engines available. A 2015 survey on 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication also found that 92% of academics surveyed used Google Scholar.

With so many researchers using Google Scholar, it’s a search engine that all journal publishers should prioritize. Google Scholar stands apart as one of the most accessible and sophisticated academic search engines available. Inclusion in Google Scholar can help expand the accessibility, reach, and, consequently, the impacts of the articles you publish.

Despite the seemingly magical ability of Google to answer any search query with endless results, it’s important for publishers to know that the search engine can only index content its crawlers are able to find (more on crawlers below!). Google Scholar also has specific inclusion criteria. If you want all of your journal articles to be added to Google Scholar, you must take steps to ensure that they can be found by the search engine and that Google Scholar recognizes your journal website as a legitimate source.

In this blog post, we overview how Google Scholar works, the benefits of Google Scholar indexing, and what you need to know to have your journal articles added to Google Scholar. Let’s get started!

What is Google Scholar exactly and how does it work?

Since you’re reading this blog post, you likely know about Google Scholar as an academic search tool. But you may not be entirely sure of how Google Scholar processes content or how it compares to Google’s general search engine. Before we get into the specific benefits of Google Scholar and its inclusion requirements, let’s first take a look at what Google Scholar is exactly and how it works.

Like Google, Google Scholar is a crawler-based search engine. Crawler-based search engines are able to index machine-readable metadata or full-text files automatically using “web crawlers,” also known as “spiders” or “bots,” which are automated internet programs that systematically “crawl” websites to identify and ingest new content.

Google Scholar has access to all of the crawlable scholarly content published on the web, with the ability to index entire publisher and journal websites as well as the ability to use the citations in the articles it has indexed to find other related content. Google Scholar includes content across academic disciplines, from all countries, and in all languages. Recent research, including Michael Gusenbauer’s article “Google Scholar to overshadow them all? Comparing the sizes of 12 academic search engines and bibliographic databases,” has found that Google Scholar is the world’s largest academic search engine, containing over 380 million records.

A common misconception about Google Scholar is that it indexes all of the content it has access to regardless of the content type or quality. This is not the case. Rather, as explained in “Academic Search Engine Optimization (ASEO): Optimizing Scholarly Literature for Google Scholar & Co.,” Google Scholar is an “invitation based search engine.” This means that “only articles from trusted sources and articles that are ‘invited’ (cited) by articles already indexed are included in the database.” On its website Google Scholar states, “we work with publishers of scholarly information to index peer-reviewed papers, theses, preprints, abstracts, and technical reports from all disciplines of research and make them searchable on Google and Google Scholar.”

In order for your journals to be considered for inclusion in Google Scholar, the content on your website must first meet two basic criteria:

  1. Consist primarily of journal articles (e.g. original research articles, technical reports)
  2. Make freely available either the full-text or the complete author-written abstract for all articles (without requiring human or search engine robot readers to log into your site, install specific software, accept any disclaimers etc.)

From there your journal website and articles will have to meet certain technical specifications, which we outline below. Before we get into that, let’s first take a look at some of the specific benefits Google Scholar offers journals and how to tell if your articles are being included in the search engine.

Why should I get my journals indexed in Google Scholar?

We’ve talked about the broad research benefits of Google Scholar, but you may be wondering — what are the specific benefits of Google Scholar indexing for the journals I publish? Google Scholar indexing can greatly expand the reach of your journal articles and improve the chances of your articles being read, shared, and cited online. A primary benefit of Google Scholar is that, unlike other databases, its search functionality focuses on individual articles, not entire journals. So having your articles indexed in Google Scholar can help more scholars discover the journals you publish when those articles show up in keyword and key phrase searches.

Getting your journal articles indexed in Google Scholar will:

  • Increase the reach of your individual journal articles because more scholars will be likely to find them
  • Give scholars an easy way to gauge how relevant your articles are to their research based on the article title and search snippet you provide
  • Help resurface old articles from the journals you publish — Google Scholar takes citations into account and shows more frequently cited works earlier in search results

For open access journals the importance of Google Scholar indexing is even greater. If you want your content to be accessible, making it freely available isn’t enough — you have to be sure that anyone can find your journal articles on the web and that they aren’t only available to scholars with access to subscription-based academic abstracting and indexing databases or prior knowledge of your journals (i.e. scholar knows to search for your specific journal website). Google Scholar makes it possible for anyone to freely search for and find relevant scholarly content on the web from anywhere in the world.

How can I tell if my journal is being indexed by Google Scholar?

As noted, Google Scholar doesn’t just index all of the content it can access on the web. Rather, it seeks to index content from what it deems to be “trusted” publication websites. If other articles from trusted websites have cited a journal article Google Scholar will know to index it, but any content that is not published on a “trusted” website and that has not been cited by an article already included in Google Scholar will not be indexed right away.

In order for Google Scholar to deem a journal website trustworthy, it must follow all of Google Scholar’s technical guidelines. Journal publishers should also contact Google Scholar to request inclusion in the index. If you’re not sure whether your journals are being indexed by Google Scholar, you can quickly check by searching your journal website domain (e.g. www.examplejournal.com) in scholar.google.com.

What steps can I take to get my journals indexed by Google Scholar?

If you find that one or more of the journals you publish are not yet being indexed by Google Scholar you’ll need to take some steps to get them added to the search engine.

Google Scholar has thorough Inclusion Guidelines for Webmasters that detail how to get your articles added to the index.

Some steps you may need to take include:

  • Checking your HTML or PDF file formats to make sure the text is searchable
  • Configuring your website to export bibliographic data in HTML meta tags
  • Publishing all articles on separate webpages (i.e. each article should have its own URL)
  • Making sure that your journal websites are available to both users and crawlers at all times
  • Making sure you have a browse interface that can be crawled by Google’s robots
  • Placing each article and each abstract in a separate HTML or PDF file (Google Scholar will not index multiple articles in the same PDF)

Google Scholar’s indexing guidelines can get pretty technical. If your journal or journals are currently hosted on a standalone website that you had custom-built or that you’re hosting via an outside provider like WordPress, you’ll need to either work with available internal IT resources to make any necessary updates or hire a web developer.

If you don’t want to deal with the technical aspects of getting your journal articles indexed in Google Scholar, you may want to consider moving your journal to a website hosted on a journal publishing platform that can take care of Google Scholar indexing for you. For example, Scholastica is already recognized as a trusted site by Google Scholar so all journals that publish via Scholastica journal websites are automatically indexed with no extra work on the part of the editors. Some journal databases, such as JSTOR or Project Muse, are also indexed by Google Scholar. So if you publish via a Google Scholar indexed aggregator or database, or if you regularly upload articles to one, you may also be able to have articles added to Google Scholar through it. You’ll want to check with any journal hosting platform or aggregator to make sure that they support indexing in Google Scholar.

However you decide to go about getting your journal articles indexed by Google Scholar, now’s the time to start! Google Scholar indexing is sure to expand the accessibility and reach of the articles you publish.

Source: https://blog.scholasticahq.com/

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JRTDD has been indexed into DOAJ

Dear readers,

It my pleasure to announce you that Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities has been indexed into DOAJ. It is a great achievement of editorial office which worked very hard in last months.

What is DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)?

DOAJ is a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals. DOAJ is independent. All funding is via donations, 18% of which comes from sponsors and 82% from members and publisher members. All DOAJ services are free of charge including being indexed in DOAJ. All data is freely available.

DOAJ operates an education and outreach program across the globe, focussing on improving the quality of applications submitted.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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JRTDD into Mendeley

Dear readers,

I want to inform you that JRTDD articles have been deposited in Mendeley.

What is Mendeley?

Mendeley is a free reference manager that can help you collect references, organize your citations, and create bibliographies.

The strength of Mendeley, however, is what it adds to that. Mendeley is also an academic social network that enables you to share your research with  others. Researchers can collaborate online in public or private groups, and search for papers in the Mendeley group database of over 30 million papers. Mendeley can help you connect with other scholars and the latest research in your subject area. Because Mendeley is now owned by Elsevier, the leading provider of science and health information, it integrates with ScienceDirect.

Mendeley is a research management tool.

With Mendeley, you can:

  • Collect references from the Web and UCI databases
  • Automatically generate citations and bibliographies
  • From within your citation library, read, annotate and highlight PDFs
  • Collaborate with other researchers online
  • Import papers from other research software
  • Find relevant papers based on what you’re reading
  • Access your papers from anywhere online
  • Read papers on the go with your iPhone or iPad
  • Build a professional presence with your Mendeley profile

Mendeley works with Windows, Mac and Linux.

Source: https://guides.lib.uci.edu/

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JRTDD indexed into QOAM (Quality Open Access Market)

Dear readers,

We have another indexing of JRTDD into QOAM (Quality Open Access Market).

What is QOAM?

Quality of Service

It is important to realise that ‘quality’ in the context of QOAM relates to the quality of a journal’s service to authors, rather than to a hypothesized quality of a journal’s scientific and scholarly content as based on citation metrics.

In QOAM, academic authors score the experience they have had with the journal’s peer review and editorial board from 1 to 5 via a concise journal score card. The QoS indicator of a journal is then defined as the product of the average score of the journal and the ‘robustness’ of this score.

The robustness relates the number N of score cards to the number A of articles (read DOIs) of the journal, both measured over the same period of time. As the number of articles of a journal varies widely, some logarithmic scaling is used to bring the result within scope. Journals with less than 10 articles are left aside. The time period is a moving window over the current year and the previous two years.

The actual formula for the robustness is: 1 + log (N/log A), with A ≥ 10.

Price information

In QOAM, the publication fee of a journal is found behind the tab ‘Price information’ on the detail page of a journal under the respective headings ‘List price’ and ‘My discount’. The first one is gathered from the journal’s web site; information about institutional discounts comes from licence brokers, like SURFmarket, publishers or libraries.

Privacy policy

QOAM is a free service, based on academic crowd sourcing. QOAM uses no cookies and can be visited anonymously. Conversely, author reviews in QOAM are named.
In order to publish a score card in QOAM one has to log in via one’s institutional email address. In practice this means that QOAM collects the names and institutional email addresses of the reviewers. No other information is collected. The names are used to sign the score cards and are publicly visible. An author’s institutional email address, however, is only shown to other authors of score cards. No other uses of these data are foreseen.
Underlying this policy are the views that (1) anonymous score cards are prone to misuse and should be avoided in QOAM and (2) authors of score cards should be able to contact each other for dialogue.
Finally, QOAM uses the https protocol for secure exchange of data. QOAM data are stored in the Netherlands and governed by Dutch c.q. European law.

Source: https://www.qoam.eu/

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