JRTDD into repository SocArXiv

Dear readers and colleagues,

I want to inform you that all JRTDD articles can be found in SocArXiv repository.

What is SocArXiv?

SocArXiv, open archive of the social sciences, provides a free, non-profit, open access platform for social scientists to upload working papers, preprints, and published papers, with the option to link data and code. SocArXiv is dedicated to opening up social science, to reach more people more effectively, to improve research, and build the future of scholarly communication.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

XML in Science Publishing

XML and the Elsevier DTD family

Elsevier’s book and journal content is based on XML. XML stands for eXtensible Markup Language. XML documents are structured (“tagged”) independently of the presentation in a way that can be extended by the developer of the XML standard that is used.

Elsevier is basing its workflow for primary book and journal publications on the “XML-first” principle: all articles and books are converted to XML as they come in and this XML is used to prepare all output, irrespective of the format.

To define the XML it employs Elsevier is using DTDs; a DTD describes which elements may be used in tagging content and which rules apply to these elements. Elsevier has developed several related DTDs for, amongst others, scientific journal articles, book chapters and abstracted information. These DTDs are currently in version 5.5, and can be accessed via this site.

The DTDs describing the journal articles and book chapters only describe the highest level structure of the product, most of which is filled with “common” elements. These are stored in a “Common Element Pool” (CEP).

The Elsevier DTDs adopt several industry standards:

  • Unicode, the character set of XML
  • CALS tables, enhancing interoperability of tables in journal articles and existing tools
  • MathML, making mathematical formulae accessible to existing and newly developed tools for the publication and exchange of mathematical information
  • XLink, used to link to documents and resources on the web.

Using content on different platforms and in different guises

Not only is Elsevier operating by the “XML-first” principle for its current journal articles and books, all legacy content dating back to Elsevier’s origins as science publisher is also available in XML. From these XML sources, content is made available in various formats such as HTML, web and print PDF and ePub. XML-based full text content is published on a number of Elsevier web sites such as ScienceDirect and Clinical Key, but is also delivered to no-Elsevier platforms like PubMed Central. XML-derived content is being used on numerous abstracting and indexing services and databases, both Elsevier owned such as Scopus and Embase, but also outside platforms like PubMed.

Elsevier enriches its XML content by including relevant metadata; retrievability is improved by the attachment of taxonomy data. Moreover, all XML content can be made available for text and data mining.

Quality control: Documentation and validation

Developing a DTD alone is insufficient to allow an XML-based process; high-quality documentation helps in clarifying the interpretation of the tags and specifying the ways in which they are used. Elsevier has developed the so-called “Tag by Tag” format for its DTD documentation. The Tag by Tag documentation describes each element in the DTD family in detail in a uniform way.

Good documentation goes along with good validation, both to capture errors efficiently and consistently and to enforce quality requirements with business partners. Just parsing a document versus the DTD is insufficient to achieve the quality level required. Elsevier has developed its own quality checking application, a configurable rules-based tool allowing checking of many aspects that go beyond the validation by a parser. The rules file is in XML format. The tool is able to check not only XML files, but any tag-based file. In addition, it contains libraries to create tag-based files from non-tag-based files, such as PDF and artwork files.

Available DTDs and their documentation

All Elsevier XML DTDs, including older versions and together with accompanying documentation, are available on the Elsevier DTDs and transport schemas page.

Source: Elsevier 

How to get your journal indexed

In most cases, the journal’s publisher (where applicable) will arrange the application to any indexing service. They also ensure that the correct communications, permissions, and systems are in place in the event of acceptance.

Your Wiley editorial representative will provide feedback on your journal, so you can estimate the likelihood of acceptance.

There are a range of factors used in when deciding whether to index a journal. It is important that these criteria are met before submitting a journal for coverage.

Examples of criteria used by Thomson Reuters

  • Timeliness of publication: Late or short publication can indicate poor academic reception, and the possibility that the journal will falter in the near future.
  • Quality of peer review: A journal must have a robust peer review system in order to maintain research quality.
  • Distinctiveness of subject area: A journal must have a distinctive aims and scope. Companies like Thomson Reuters want to index titles that cause a redundancy or unnecessary addition. You have to show how your title will enrich the database.
  • Internationality: Unless a journal is regional, you should try to reflect geographical diversity of the subject area in your authors and editorial board.
  • Number of citations: Journals are often rejected because of low citation levels in their category. This may because a journal is largely uncited, because its main competitors are not indexed and there is no record of articles that cite the journal.

Source: https://authorservices.wiley.com

What is BASE?

BASE is one of the world’s most voluminous search engines especially for academic web resources. BASE provides more than 100 million documents from more than 5,000 sources. You can access the full texts of about 60% of the indexed documents for free (Open Access). BASE is operated by Bielefeld University Library.

We are indexing the metadata of all kinds of academically relevant resources – journals, institutional repositories, digital collections etc. – which provide an OAI interface and use OAI-PMH for providing their contents (see our Golden Rules for Repository Managers and learn more about OAI at the Open Archives Initiative or Wikipedia).

The index is continuously enhanced by integrating further sources (you can suggest a source which is not indexed yet). We are working on several new features like a claiming service for authors within the ORCID DE project.

BASE is a registered OAI service provider. Database managers can integrate the BASE index into their local infrastructure (e.g. meta search engines, library catalogues). Further on there are several tools and services for users, database and repository managers.

In comparison to commercial search engines, BASE is charcterised by the following features:

  • Intellectually selected resources
  • Only document servers that comply with the specific requirements of academic quality and relevance are included
  • A data resources inventory provides transparency in the searches
  • Discloses web resources of the “Deep Web”, which are ignored by commercial search engines or get lost in the vast quantity of hits
  • Correction, normalization and enrichment of metadata by means of automated methods
  • The display of search results includes precise bibliographic data
  • Display of access and terms of re-use for a document
  • Several options for sorting the result list
  • “Refine your search result” options (by author, subject, DDC, year of publication, content provider, language, document type, access and terms of re-use)
  • Browsing by DDC (Dewey Decimal Classification), document type, access and terms of re-use / licence.

Source: Bilefeld Academic Search Engine