#JRTDD has been indexed in Sciencegate

Dear colleagues,

One more indexing for today of #JRTDD into Sciencegate.

he aim of Sciencegate is to make scientific literature from the open access segment available free of charge on the internet. Sciencegate is an initiative of the company Novalogix AG.

In order to achieve this goal, scientific data from over 4,000 universities and open access journals are collected, categorised and refined in the Sciencegate internal database, which currently contains over 120 million data records relating to scientific articles. This places Sciencegate in the premier league of scientific document archiving and collecting within the framework of the OA Initiative. Newly published articles from all over the world are recorded and made available within just 24 hours via Sciencegate as a daily updated single point of entry for science and research.

In addition to the publicly accessible web platform www.sciencegate.ch, which currently holds over 1.8 million articles categorised by scientific discipline, Sciencegate also offers universities, scientific institutes, publishers and private enterprises the opportunity to integrate collections of articles from their chosen specialist fields and data sources into their own information platforms cost-effectively within just a few days.

Should you wish to provide feedback or have any suggestions for improvement or questions regarding data integration, or require support with the creation of your information platform, please feel free to contact us at any time.

Source: http://www.sciencegate.ch/

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

#JRTDD has been indexed into TDNet

Dear readers,

We want to inform you that JRTDD has been updated into TDNet knowledgebase from Israel.

TDNet’s Library Portal is a modern library-specific content management system (CMS) that’s easy for librarians to create, manage and control for maximum IT independence and customization flexibility. Librarians enjoy the freedom of the feature-rich, plug-and-play interface and readily available TDNet vendor support for customizing the library portal to specific workflow, branding, delivery and content page layout needs.

Source: https://www.tdnet.io

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

#JRTDD has been indexed in Finish database

Dear colleagues,

Today we have another one indexing into Finish data base JUFO Portal.

What is JUFO portal?

The JUFO Portal brings the information services of Publication Forum together in one place.

In the Portal, you can:

  • perform searches
  • create your own journal lists
  • suggest new publication channels
  • propose a higher or lower level for a publication channel
  • suggest a correction to the metadata of a publication channel

Cheers,

JRTDD Editor-in-Chief

#JRTDD has been indexed into EuroPub

Dear readers,

We are glad to announce you that our #JRTDD has been indexed into EuroPub database on May 11th 2019. Its indexing is growing up from day to day.

What is EuroPub?

EuroPub is a comprehensive, multipurpose database covering scholarly literature, with indexed records from active, authoritative journals, and indexes articles from journals all over the world. The result is an exhaustive database that assists research in every field. Easy access to a vast database at one place, reduces searching and data reviewing time considerably and helps authors in preparing new articles to a great extent. EuroPub aims at increasing the visibility of open access scholarly journals, thereby promoting their increased usage and impact.

Cheers,

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

JRTDD indexed into CORE

Dear readers,

I want to inform you that our jouinral JRTDD is already indexed into CORE.

“CORE has supported the Open Access Button in connecting researchers and the public with the research they need. CORE facilitates access to the results of millions of research papers, a crucial function in the Open Access movement:”.

Joe Mcarthur and David Carroll, Founders of the Open Access Button
JRTDD Editor-in-chief

#JRTDD indexed into Crossref

Dear readers,

I want to inform you that you can find #JRTDD articles into Crossref.

What is Crossref?

Crossref makes research outputs easy to find, cite, link, and assess.

They are a not-for-profit membership organization that exists to make scholarly communications better. They rally the community; tag and share metadata; run an open infrastructure; play with technology; and make tools and services—all to help put scholarly content in context.

It’s as simple—and as complicated—as that.

JRTDD Editor-in-Chief

 

JRTDD into repository SocArXiv

Dear readers and colleagues,

I want to inform you that all JRTDD articles can be found in SocArXiv repository.

What is SocArXiv?

SocArXiv, open archive of the social sciences, provides a free, non-profit, open access platform for social scientists to upload working papers, preprints, and published papers, with the option to link data and code. SocArXiv is dedicated to opening up social science, to reach more people more effectively, to improve research, and build the future of scholarly communication.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

XML in Science Publishing

XML and the Elsevier DTD family

Elsevier’s book and journal content is based on XML. XML stands for eXtensible Markup Language. XML documents are structured (“tagged”) independently of the presentation in a way that can be extended by the developer of the XML standard that is used.

Elsevier is basing its workflow for primary book and journal publications on the “XML-first” principle: all articles and books are converted to XML as they come in and this XML is used to prepare all output, irrespective of the format.

To define the XML it employs Elsevier is using DTDs; a DTD describes which elements may be used in tagging content and which rules apply to these elements. Elsevier has developed several related DTDs for, amongst others, scientific journal articles, book chapters and abstracted information. These DTDs are currently in version 5.5, and can be accessed via this site.

The DTDs describing the journal articles and book chapters only describe the highest level structure of the product, most of which is filled with “common” elements. These are stored in a “Common Element Pool” (CEP).

The Elsevier DTDs adopt several industry standards:

  • Unicode, the character set of XML
  • CALS tables, enhancing interoperability of tables in journal articles and existing tools
  • MathML, making mathematical formulae accessible to existing and newly developed tools for the publication and exchange of mathematical information
  • XLink, used to link to documents and resources on the web.

Using content on different platforms and in different guises

Not only is Elsevier operating by the “XML-first” principle for its current journal articles and books, all legacy content dating back to Elsevier’s origins as science publisher is also available in XML. From these XML sources, content is made available in various formats such as HTML, web and print PDF and ePub. XML-based full text content is published on a number of Elsevier web sites such as ScienceDirect and Clinical Key, but is also delivered to no-Elsevier platforms like PubMed Central. XML-derived content is being used on numerous abstracting and indexing services and databases, both Elsevier owned such as Scopus and Embase, but also outside platforms like PubMed.

Elsevier enriches its XML content by including relevant metadata; retrievability is improved by the attachment of taxonomy data. Moreover, all XML content can be made available for text and data mining.

Quality control: Documentation and validation

Developing a DTD alone is insufficient to allow an XML-based process; high-quality documentation helps in clarifying the interpretation of the tags and specifying the ways in which they are used. Elsevier has developed the so-called “Tag by Tag” format for its DTD documentation. The Tag by Tag documentation describes each element in the DTD family in detail in a uniform way.

Good documentation goes along with good validation, both to capture errors efficiently and consistently and to enforce quality requirements with business partners. Just parsing a document versus the DTD is insufficient to achieve the quality level required. Elsevier has developed its own quality checking application, a configurable rules-based tool allowing checking of many aspects that go beyond the validation by a parser. The rules file is in XML format. The tool is able to check not only XML files, but any tag-based file. In addition, it contains libraries to create tag-based files from non-tag-based files, such as PDF and artwork files.

Available DTDs and their documentation

All Elsevier XML DTDs, including older versions and together with accompanying documentation, are available on the Elsevier DTDs and transport schemas page.

Source: Elsevier 

How to get your journal indexed

In most cases, the journal’s publisher (where applicable) will arrange the application to any indexing service. They also ensure that the correct communications, permissions, and systems are in place in the event of acceptance.

Your Wiley editorial representative will provide feedback on your journal, so you can estimate the likelihood of acceptance.

There are a range of factors used in when deciding whether to index a journal. It is important that these criteria are met before submitting a journal for coverage.

Examples of criteria used by Thomson Reuters

  • Timeliness of publication: Late or short publication can indicate poor academic reception, and the possibility that the journal will falter in the near future.
  • Quality of peer review: A journal must have a robust peer review system in order to maintain research quality.
  • Distinctiveness of subject area: A journal must have a distinctive aims and scope. Companies like Thomson Reuters want to index titles that cause a redundancy or unnecessary addition. You have to show how your title will enrich the database.
  • Internationality: Unless a journal is regional, you should try to reflect geographical diversity of the subject area in your authors and editorial board.
  • Number of citations: Journals are often rejected because of low citation levels in their category. This may because a journal is largely uncited, because its main competitors are not indexed and there is no record of articles that cite the journal.

Source: https://authorservices.wiley.com