JRTDD into repository SocArXiv

Dear readers and colleagues,

I want to inform you that all JRTDD articles can be found in SocArXiv repository.

What is SocArXiv?

SocArXiv, open archive of the social sciences, provides a free, non-profit, open access platform for social scientists to upload working papers, preprints, and published papers, with the option to link data and code. SocArXiv is dedicated to opening up social science, to reach more people more effectively, to improve research, and build the future of scholarly communication.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

OpenCitations on JRTDD web site

Dear readers,

We created an link of  OpenCitations on JRTDD web site. 

OpenCitations is a scholarly infrastructure organization dedicated to open scholarship and the publication of open bibliographic and citation data by the use of Semantic Web (Linked Data) technologies, and engaged in advocacy for semantic publishing and open citations. It provides the OpenCitations Data Model and the SPAR (Semantic Publishing and Referencing) Ontologies for encoding scholarly bibliographic and citation data in RDF, and open software of generic applicability for searching, browsing and providing APIs over RDF triplestores. It has developed the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC) of open downloadable bibliographic and citation data recorded in RDF, and a system and resolution service for Open Citation Identifiers (OCIs), and it is currently developing a number of Open Citation Indexes using the data openly available in third-party bibliographic databases.

OpenCitations is currently working to expand and improve the supporting infrastructure of the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC), our open repository of scholarly citation data made available under a Creative Commons public domain dedication, which provides in RDF accurate citation information (bibliographic references) harvested from the scholarly literature. These are described using the SPAR Ontologiesaccording to the OpenCitations Data Model, and are made freely available so that others may freely build upon, enhance and reuse them for any purpose, without restriction under copyright or database law.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

JRTDD articles into XML files

Dear readers,

I want to announce that you can find #JRTDD articles into XML files which will increase the visibility and probably indexing of our journal.

What is XML?

XML is a file extension for an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file format used to create common information formats and share both the format and the data on the World Wide Web, intranets, and elsewhere using standard ASCII text.

XML is similar to HTML. Both XML and HTML contain markup symbols to describe the contents of a page or file. HTML, however, describes the content of a Web page (mainly text and graphic images) only in terms of how it is to be displayed and interacted with. For example, the letter “p” placed within markup tags starts a new paragraph.

XML describes the content in terms of what data is being described. For example, the word “phonenum” placed within markup tags could indicate that the data that followed was a phone number. An XML file can be processed purely as data by a program or it can be stored with similar data on another computer or it can be displayed, like an HTML file. For example, depending on how the application in the receiving computer wanted to handle the phone number, it could be stored, displayed, or dialed.

You can find articles from Vol.1, Issue 1 in XML here. I would like to say big gratitude to our web administrator @Gjorgji Pop Gjorgjiev for giving us this opportunity.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief