JRTDD indexed into QOAM (Quality Open Access Market)

Dear readers,

We have another indexing of JRTDD into QOAM (Quality Open Access Market).

What is QOAM?

Quality of Service

It is important to realise that ‘quality’ in the context of QOAM relates to the quality of a journal’s service to authors, rather than to a hypothesized quality of a journal’s scientific and scholarly content as based on citation metrics.

In QOAM, academic authors score the experience they have had with the journal’s peer review and editorial board from 1 to 5 via a concise journal score card. The QoS indicator of a journal is then defined as the product of the average score of the journal and the ‘robustness’ of this score.

The robustness relates the number N of score cards to the number A of articles (read DOIs) of the journal, both measured over the same period of time. As the number of articles of a journal varies widely, some logarithmic scaling is used to bring the result within scope. Journals with less than 10 articles are left aside. The time period is a moving window over the current year and the previous two years.

The actual formula for the robustness is: 1 + log (N/log A), with A ≥ 10.

Price information

In QOAM, the publication fee of a journal is found behind the tab ‘Price information’ on the detail page of a journal under the respective headings ‘List price’ and ‘My discount’. The first one is gathered from the journal’s web site; information about institutional discounts comes from licence brokers, like SURFmarket, publishers or libraries.

Privacy policy

QOAM is a free service, based on academic crowd sourcing. QOAM uses no cookies and can be visited anonymously. Conversely, author reviews in QOAM are named.
In order to publish a score card in QOAM one has to log in via one’s institutional email address. In practice this means that QOAM collects the names and institutional email addresses of the reviewers. No other information is collected. The names are used to sign the score cards and are publicly visible. An author’s institutional email address, however, is only shown to other authors of score cards. No other uses of these data are foreseen.
Underlying this policy are the views that (1) anonymous score cards are prone to misuse and should be avoided in QOAM and (2) authors of score cards should be able to contact each other for dialogue.
Finally, QOAM uses the https protocol for secure exchange of data. QOAM data are stored in the Netherlands and governed by Dutch c.q. European law.

Source: https://www.qoam.eu/

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JRTDD indexed into Semantic Scholar

Dear readers,

With great pleasure I want to inform you that JRTDD is already indexed in Semantic Scholar.

What is Semantic Scholar?

Semantic Scholar is a project developed at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence. Publicly released in November 2015, it is designed to be an AI-backed search engine for academic publications.[1] The project uses a combination of machine learningnatural language processing, and machine vision to add a layer of semantic analysis to the traditional methods of citation analysis, and to extract relevant figures, entities, and venues from papers.[2] In comparison to Google Scholar and PubMed, Semantic Scholar is designed to highlight the most important and influential papers, and to identify the connections between them.

Source: Wikipedia

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AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-ESTEEM LEVELS IN ADULTS AND RETROSPECTIVE REPORTS OF THEIR PEER RELATIONS AND MOTOR SKILLS IN CHILDHOOD

Adella GILL1,
Sophie BRIGSTOCKE1,
Adam GOODY1,2
1Department of Psychology, University of York
2Department of Psychology, Durham University
E-mail: sophie.brigstocke@york.ac.uk
Received: 03-March-2020
Revised: 15-April-2020
Accepted: 28-April-2020
Online first: 29-April-2020

Abstract

Introduction: The association between motor coordination difficulties (a core feature of Developmental Coordination Disorder) and mental health difficulties, such as low self-worth, anxiety and depression is well documented. This study extends existing research by exploring whether this association is mediated by factors such as bullying or social inclusion during childhood.

Method: This study used a retrospective design in which 217 adult participants completed an online questionnaire which asked about their motor skills in childhood, recollections of peer relationships in primary school, and their current level of self-esteem.

Results: Participants’ recollections of their motor skills in childhood was strongly associated with their current self-esteem self-rating. This finding is consistent with previous studies. Investigation of this association suggests it was mediated by participants reporting lower feelings of social inclusion in childhood. This suggests that adults who report feeling socially excluded at primary school are at risk of experiencing lower levels of self-esteem in adulthood. Interestingly, no association was revealed between low levels of adult self-esteem and recollections of overt bullying in childhood.

Conclusions: This finding, if extended suggests that social exclusion in childhood may be a risk factor for future wellbeing and self-esteem of individuals with difficulties with motor skills. This could have important practical implications, highlighting the importance of initiatives offered within primary schools to support social inclusion, especially for those with motor coordination difficulties. Teachers are well trained on anti-bullying tactics and anti-bullying campaigns are promoted to pupils in many areas. However, it is not clear that the impact of social exclusion, which can be harder to monitor, is highlighted as prominently. Further studies should consider gathering information from children and charting their self-esteem and perceived social inclusion longitudinally.

Key words: Developmental Coordination Disorder, Motor Coordination Difficulties, Bullying, Self Esteem, Social Exclusion, School Peer Relations

Citation: Gill, A., Brigstocke, S., Goody, A. An exploratory study of the association between self-esteem levels in adults and retrospective reports of their peer relations and motor skills in childhood. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):24-33. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.28

Full Text Article

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