Share, cite, mention, link JRTDD articles

Dear readers and potential authors,

As you already knew we released the newest Issue 3, Volume 1 at July 5th and you can find it here. I want to stress your attention on the importance of social media in scientific publishing. There are some scientific articles which show that papers which are sharedmentioned, linked on social media such us: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Mendeley, Research Gate, Academia.edu and others are more cited papers than those which are not. I hope all of you have at least one profile on these social media. I would like to ask you to do that with your papers published previously in our Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. On the right menu of our web site you can find social media buttons and you can do that very easily. You should go to some article which is your favorite and then share it or link it. It will take you less than one minute.

With this, you will increase the visibility of JRTDD papers and possibility to be cited by other authors. Also the journal will increase its visibility and international impact in the field of reattach therapy, developmental diversities and rehabilitation sciences as well.

Also, I hope that you will find an interest in submitting some paper in JRTDD in near future. Hoping that it would not be a problem for you, I am sending to you warm regards.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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Experiences of Family Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia

Christina N. MARSACK-TOPOLEWSKI1,
Anna M. BRADY2

1Eastern Michigan University College of Health and Human Services,
School of Social Work, Michigan, USA
2Erskine College, Special Education Department, South Carolina, USA
E-mail: ctopole1@emich.edu
Received: 04-May-2020
Revised: 28-May-2020
Accepted: 02-June-2020
Online first: 03-June-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Dementia poses a number of impairments in cognitive functioning impacting everyday operational tasks and functions. Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) may experience dementia earlier and at a greater rate than the general population. Dementia can pose complex challenges for individuals with ID and their caregivers.

Aim: A qualitative phenomenological study was used to examine the lived experiences of caregivers of individuals diagnosed with both ID and dementia.

Method: Individual interviews were conducted among six participants, who were all family caregivers of individuals diagnosed with both ID and dementia.

Results: Based on the results from the content analysis of interview responses, four themes emerged: (a) difficulty getting a dementia diagnosis, (b) barriers to obtaining services, (c) caregiving realities and challenges, and (d) rewards of caregiving.

Implications for Practice: To support caregivers, practitioners should be adequately trained on this dual diagnosis to assess the support needs in helping caregivers obtain adequate services.

Conclusion: As individuals with ID continue to live longer and age, many will experience dementia. Caregivers of individuals with ID and dementia are often an overlooked, vulnerable population. Practitioners should be aware of their needs in order to provide adequate support to this caregiving population and individuals with ID and dementia.

Key words: caregiving, dementia, intellectual disability, developmental disabilities

Citation: Marsack-Topolewski, N. C., Brady, M. A. Experiences of Family Caregivers of Individuals with ID and Dementia. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):54-64. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.29

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Effect of auditory training intervention on auditory perception problem of children with perceptual disorders in Nigeria

Patricia KWALZOOM LONGPOE
Department of Special Education & Rehabilitation Sciences
University of Jos, Jos. Nigeria
E-mail: atinuola70@gmail.com
Received: 20-March-2020
Revised: 17-April-2020
Accepted: 22-April-2020
Online first: 23-April-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Perceptual disorders are a broad group of disturbances or dysfunctions of the central nervous system that interfere with the conscious mental recognition of sensory stimuli. Such conditions are caused by lesions of specific sites in the cerebral cortex that may result from any illness or trauma affecting the brain at any age or stage of development.

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to find and establish the effect of auditory training intervention on the auditory perception problems of children with perceptual disorders in Alheri Special School, Yangoji, Kwali Abuja, Nigeria.

Methods: This study adopted quasi-experimental design. Specifically, the Case Study Report is applied in this study, with two (2) children identified with perceptual disorders as participants for the study. Two set of instruments were adapted and validated.

Results: The results of the study revealed that auditory perception of child A and B at pre-test are significantly low, and an increase in the levels of auditory perception were recorded for the two children post-test. The findings also showed the extent of which auditory training improves auditory discrimination, awareness, figure-ground, memory and auditory blending of children with perceptual disorders.

Conclusion: The study concluded that children with perceptual disorders who have auditory perceptual disorders have improved in their auditory perception, and there is need for more auditory training therapy for children with perceptual disorders. The study recommended that teachers and professionals should develop a positive attitude towards auditory training therapy for children with perceptual disorders.

Key words: Perceptual Disorders, Auditory Perception, Auditory Training

Citation: Kwalzoom Longopoe P. Effect of auditory training intervention on auditory perception problem of children with perceptual disorders in Nigeria. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):42-53. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.27

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Dissociative Phenomenology and General Health in Normal Population

Sushma RATHEE1,
Pradeep KUMAR2

1Department of Psychology, Mahrishi Dayanand University,
Rohtak, Haryana, India
2Consultant Psychiatric Social Work, Pt. B.D.S., PGIMS, Rohtak, India
E-mail: sushmaratheecp@gmail.com
Received: 01-June-2020
Revised: 23-June-2020
Accepted: 02-July-2020
Online first: 03-July-2020

Abstract

Background: Dissociative symptoms are most commonly found in females and adolescents, and when discussing their background, they can be from lower socio-economic backgrounds and rural areas. They are always preceded by psychosocial stressors. Dissociative disorders previously known as “hysteria” have been described since antiquity and Hippocrates even hypothesised “wandering uterus” to be the cause for dissociation in females. With the advances in science, there has been shift from these religious and spiritual concepts to a scientific basis for dissociation.

Aim: To assess the dissociative phenomenology in normal population and to assess the subjective health in normal population.

Methods: A group of 100 (50 females & 50 males) were selected from the community using a snowball sampling technique.

Tools: Socio-demographic data sheet, General Health Questionnaire-12 and Dissociative Experience Scale-II were used.

Results: The study found that females differ from males in the reporting of subjective health rating (X2=5.76, p=0.01) and similar results shown in terms of dissociative phenomenology (X2=67.76, p=0.001).

Discussion: It has been found that only 4% from the female group and 2% from the male group rated their health under the “normal” category. 52% of females and 64% of males were categorised under “mild ill health” and 24% to 26% were in “moderate ill health”, whereas 20% of female participants and 8% of male participants rated their health as “severely ill”. In another domain of the study, dissociative phenomenology, 32% of female participants reported severe dissociative symptoms and 38% of male participants also showed similar results.

Conclusion: Dissociative disorder significantly affects the population but it is hard to diagnose due to factors such as; cultural factors, socio-economic factors etc. The study shows clearly that dissociative symptoms are found in the general population also.

Key words: Dissociation, Phenomenology, General Health, Disorder, Healthy population

Citation: Rathee, S., Kumar, P. Dissociative Phenomenology and General health in Normal Population. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):34-41. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.32

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JRTDD into Mendeley

Dear readers,

I want to inform you that JRTDD articles have been deposited in Mendeley.

What is Mendeley?

Mendeley is a free reference manager that can help you collect references, organize your citations, and create bibliographies.

The strength of Mendeley, however, is what it adds to that. Mendeley is also an academic social network that enables you to share your research with  others. Researchers can collaborate online in public or private groups, and search for papers in the Mendeley group database of over 30 million papers. Mendeley can help you connect with other scholars and the latest research in your subject area. Because Mendeley is now owned by Elsevier, the leading provider of science and health information, it integrates with ScienceDirect.

Mendeley is a research management tool.

With Mendeley, you can:

  • Collect references from the Web and UCI databases
  • Automatically generate citations and bibliographies
  • From within your citation library, read, annotate and highlight PDFs
  • Collaborate with other researchers online
  • Import papers from other research software
  • Find relevant papers based on what you’re reading
  • Access your papers from anywhere online
  • Read papers on the go with your iPhone or iPad
  • Build a professional presence with your Mendeley profile

Mendeley works with Windows, Mac and Linux.

Source: https://guides.lib.uci.edu/

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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JRTDD indexed into QOAM (Quality Open Access Market)

Dear readers,

We have another indexing of JRTDD into QOAM (Quality Open Access Market).

What is QOAM?

Quality of Service

It is important to realise that ‘quality’ in the context of QOAM relates to the quality of a journal’s service to authors, rather than to a hypothesized quality of a journal’s scientific and scholarly content as based on citation metrics.

In QOAM, academic authors score the experience they have had with the journal’s peer review and editorial board from 1 to 5 via a concise journal score card. The QoS indicator of a journal is then defined as the product of the average score of the journal and the ‘robustness’ of this score.

The robustness relates the number N of score cards to the number A of articles (read DOIs) of the journal, both measured over the same period of time. As the number of articles of a journal varies widely, some logarithmic scaling is used to bring the result within scope. Journals with less than 10 articles are left aside. The time period is a moving window over the current year and the previous two years.

The actual formula for the robustness is: 1 + log (N/log A), with A ≥ 10.

Price information

In QOAM, the publication fee of a journal is found behind the tab ‘Price information’ on the detail page of a journal under the respective headings ‘List price’ and ‘My discount’. The first one is gathered from the journal’s web site; information about institutional discounts comes from licence brokers, like SURFmarket, publishers or libraries.

Privacy policy

QOAM is a free service, based on academic crowd sourcing. QOAM uses no cookies and can be visited anonymously. Conversely, author reviews in QOAM are named.
In order to publish a score card in QOAM one has to log in via one’s institutional email address. In practice this means that QOAM collects the names and institutional email addresses of the reviewers. No other information is collected. The names are used to sign the score cards and are publicly visible. An author’s institutional email address, however, is only shown to other authors of score cards. No other uses of these data are foreseen.
Underlying this policy are the views that (1) anonymous score cards are prone to misuse and should be avoided in QOAM and (2) authors of score cards should be able to contact each other for dialogue.
Finally, QOAM uses the https protocol for secure exchange of data. QOAM data are stored in the Netherlands and governed by Dutch c.q. European law.

Source: https://www.qoam.eu/

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JRTDD indexed into Semantic Scholar

Dear readers,

With great pleasure I want to inform you that JRTDD is already indexed in Semantic Scholar.

What is Semantic Scholar?

Semantic Scholar is a project developed at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence. Publicly released in November 2015, it is designed to be an AI-backed search engine for academic publications.[1] The project uses a combination of machine learningnatural language processing, and machine vision to add a layer of semantic analysis to the traditional methods of citation analysis, and to extract relevant figures, entities, and venues from papers.[2] In comparison to Google Scholar and PubMed, Semantic Scholar is designed to highlight the most important and influential papers, and to identify the connections between them.

Source: Wikipedia

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AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-ESTEEM LEVELS IN ADULTS AND RETROSPECTIVE REPORTS OF THEIR PEER RELATIONS AND MOTOR SKILLS IN CHILDHOOD

Adella GILL1,
Sophie BRIGSTOCKE1,
Adam GOODY1,2
1Department of Psychology, University of York
2Department of Psychology, Durham University
E-mail: sophie.brigstocke@york.ac.uk
Received: 03-March-2020
Revised: 15-April-2020
Accepted: 28-April-2020
Online first: 29-April-2020

Abstract

Introduction: The association between motor coordination difficulties (a core feature of Developmental Coordination Disorder) and mental health difficulties, such as low self-worth, anxiety and depression is well documented. This study extends existing research by exploring whether this association is mediated by factors such as bullying or social inclusion during childhood.

Method: This study used a retrospective design in which 217 adult participants completed an online questionnaire which asked about their motor skills in childhood, recollections of peer relationships in primary school, and their current level of self-esteem.

Results: Participants’ recollections of their motor skills in childhood was strongly associated with their current self-esteem self-rating. This finding is consistent with previous studies. Investigation of this association suggests it was mediated by participants reporting lower feelings of social inclusion in childhood. This suggests that adults who report feeling socially excluded at primary school are at risk of experiencing lower levels of self-esteem in adulthood. Interestingly, no association was revealed between low levels of adult self-esteem and recollections of overt bullying in childhood.

Conclusions: This finding, if extended suggests that social exclusion in childhood may be a risk factor for future wellbeing and self-esteem of individuals with difficulties with motor skills. This could have important practical implications, highlighting the importance of initiatives offered within primary schools to support social inclusion, especially for those with motor coordination difficulties. Teachers are well trained on anti-bullying tactics and anti-bullying campaigns are promoted to pupils in many areas. However, it is not clear that the impact of social exclusion, which can be harder to monitor, is highlighted as prominently. Further studies should consider gathering information from children and charting their self-esteem and perceived social inclusion longitudinally.

Key words: Developmental Coordination Disorder, Motor Coordination Difficulties, Bullying, Self Esteem, Social Exclusion, School Peer Relations

Citation: Gill, A., Brigstocke, S., Goody, A. An exploratory study of the association between self-esteem levels in adults and retrospective reports of their peer relations and motor skills in childhood. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):24-33. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.28

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PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

Vladimir TRAJKOVSKI
Institute of Special Education and Rehabilitation
Faculty of Philosophy, University “Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Skopje
Republic of Macedonia
E-mail: vladotra@fzf.ukim.edu.mk
Received: 08-May-2020
Revised: 09-June-2020
Accepted: 14-June-2020
Online first: 15-June-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition that occurs within the first 3 years of life, which is characterised by poor social skills, communication problems and stereotyped patterns of behaviour. Autism is a life-long disorder that has a substantial effect on the individual, their family, and society.
The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview about the psychosocial aspects of autism spectrum disorders.

Methods: An analysis of relevant literature, sources from the internet and published literature, personal experience and observations of the author.

Findings: Despite widespread research and greater public awareness, ASD has an unclear etiology and no known cure, making it difficult to acquire an accurate and timely diagnosis. Psychologic functions such as attention, executive function, academic functioning, memory, emotions, and sensory processing are described. There is a need for continuous psycho-social support for people with ASD and their relatives during the diagnostics and early intervention period, as well as resources that better represent the diversity of experiences and symptoms associated with ASD across the lifespan.

Conclusion: It is clear that more special education services are needed, together with timely and ongoing psychosocial support to parents of children with ASD.

Key words: autism spectrum disorder, neurodevelopmental condition, psychological aspects.

Citation: Trajkovski, V. Psychological aspects of autism spectrum disorder. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):14-23. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.30

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IDENTIFYING IMPACT IN A TRANSNATIONAL PROJECT PROVIDING PARENT EDUCATION FOR FAMILIES LIVING WITH AUTISM IN SOUTH-EAST EUROPE

Paul BRAMBLE1,
David PREECE2

1Research & Innovation Funding Support, University of Northampton, UK
2Centre for Education and Research, University of Northampton, UK
E-mail: david.preece@northampton.ac.uk
Received: 25-January-2020
Revised: 20-February-2020
Accepted: 27-February-2020
Online first: 28-February-2020

Abstract

Introduction: Impact is a key concept in all aspects of research and development activity. The extent to which it is effectively identified can affect research activity at all levels: from whether an individual project is funded, to the funding granted to – and the reputations of – entire institutions. Funding for research and other activity supporting education and social inclusion is limited and highly contested. It is therefore imperative that impact is effectively identified.

Objective: The Erasmus+ National Agencies’ Impact+ tool was developed to help projects identify impact in four domains: systemic impact, impact regarding target groups, impact to partner organisations and impact to project personnel. This paper discusses this tool’s adaptation to identify impact in a three-year transnational project where a partnership of universities, schools, non-governmental organisations and small enterprises developed, provided and evaluated parent education in autism in three south-east European countries.

Method: A semi-structured questionnaire was completed by personnel from partner organisations within the project (n=16). Findings regarding the four domains of impact are presented, and differences of response within the partnership are discussed.

Conclusion: It is suggested that this tool is helpful in supporting a broader conceptualisation of impact, and has wider utility.

Key words: research impact, research evaluation, Erasmus+, Impact+

Citation: Bramble, P., Preeced, D. Identifying impact in a transnational project providing parent education for families living with autism in south-east Europe. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities, 2020 Jul 05; 3(1):4-13. https://doi.org/10.26407/2020jrtdd.1.26

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