#JRTDD into #OpenDOAR

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JRTDD has new indexing into OpenDOAR.

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Source: http://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/

#JRTDD into JURN

Dear readers,

#JRTDD is now indexed into JURN.

JURN is a unique search tool, helping you to find free academic articles and books. JURN harnesses all the power of Google, but focusses your search through a hand-crafted and curated index. Established in 2009 to comprehensively cover the arts and humanities, in 2014 JURN expanded in scope. JURN now also covers selected university full-text repositories and many additional ejournals in science, biomedical, business and law. In 2015/6 JURN expanded again, adding over 600 ejournals on aspects of the natural world.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

 

How satisfaction and self-efficacy for inclusive education matter for Swedish special educators’ assessment practices of students with intellectual disability

Monica REICHENBERG1,
Kent LOFGREN2

1Department of Education and special education,
The University of Gothenburg, Sweden
2Department of Education, Umea University, Sweden
E-mail: monica.reichenberg@ped.gu.se
Received: 28-April-2019
Revised: 11-June-2019
Accepted: 24June-2019
Online first: 26-June-2019

Abstract

Introduction:Assessment of learning outcomes is integral to both mainstream and special needs comprehensive schools for students with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, assessment of students with ID poses a challenge both to special educators and their cooperation with mainstream teachers in cases of fully included students with ID with an individualised curriculum.

Objectives: We describe and predict the type of assessment practices Swedish special educators in special needs comprehensive schools use for assessment of students with ID.

Methods: Swedish special educators (n = 148) were recruited using a non-random sample. To analyse our data, we used the item response model. In addition, we analysed special educators’ expected satisfaction with assessments using linear regression and logistic regression.

Results: The study suggests that special educators had the greatest difficulty conducting multiple choice and written assessments. Moreover, the study suggests that satisfaction with assessment and self-efficacy for inclusion matters for predicting types of assessment practice. In addition, the study reports an interaction between job satisfaction for moderately experienced special educators that predicts both types of assessment practice and the special educators’ satisfaction with assessment.

Conclusion: We demonstrate how assessment satisfaction, self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and experience matter for special educators’ assessment of students with ID.

Key words:special educators, intellectual disability, assessment, satisfaction, self-efficacy

Citation: Reichenberg, M., Lofgren, M. How satisfaction and self-efficacy for inclusive education matter for Swedish special educators’ assessment practices of students with intellectual disability. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. https://doi.org/10.26407/2019jrtdd.1.17

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#JRTDD into ResearchGate

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It is my pleasure to announce that #JRTDD articles are included into very popular ResearchGate network. With this they become more visible to the scientific community.

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JRTDD Editor-in-chief