JRTDD indexed into ROAD

Dear readers,

I want to announce that JRTDD is already into ROAD. It is one more achievment of editorial office. This our 21st indexation. ROAD is Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources.

ROAD has been developed with the support of the Communication and Inform…ation Sector of UNESCO, it provides a free access to a subset of the ISSN Register. This subset comprises bibliographic records which describe scholarly resources in Open Access identified by an ISSN : journals, monographic series, conference proceedings and academic repositories. ROAD records are enriched by metadata about the coverage of the resources by indexing and abstracting databases, registries and journals indicators. They are downloadable as a MARC XML dump and will be available as RDF triples in 2014.

With respect,

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

 

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JRTDD indexed into ScienceOpen

Respected colleagues,

With great happiness I want to inform you that JRTDD is already indexed into ScienceOpen. After several months of negotiations finally we succeed it. We hope that this indexing will increase the visibility and readership world wide.

What is ScienceOpen?

ScienceOpen is a discovery platform with interactive features for scholars to enhance their research in the open, make an impact, and receive credit for it. We provide context building services for publishers, to bring researchers closer to the content than ever before. Our advanced search and discovery functions, combined with post-publication peer review, recommendation, social sharing, and collection-building features make ScienceOpen the only research platform you’ll ever need.

With respect,

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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Immune, Autonomic, and Endocrine Dysregulation in Autism and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders Versus Unaffected Controls

Emily L. Casanova1,
Julia L. Sharp2,
Stephen M. Edelson3,
Desmond P. Kelly1, 4,
Estate M. Sokhadze1,
Manuel F. Casanova1, 4

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of South Carolina
School of Medicine Greenville, South Carolina, USA
2Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
3Autism Research Institute (ARI), San Diego, California, USA
4Department of Pediatrics, Greenville Health System Children’s Hospital, Greenville, South Carolina, USA
E-mail: casanove@greenvillemed.sc.edu
Received: 1-October-2019
Revised: 23-October-2019
Accepted: 30-October-2019
Online first: 31-October-2019

Abstract

Background: A growing body of literature suggests etiological overlap between Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS)/hypermobility spectrum disorders (HSD) and some cases of autism, although this relationship is poorly delineated. In addition, immune, autonomic, and endocrine dysregulation are reported in both conditions and may be relevant to their respective etiologies.

Aims: To study symptom overlap in these two comorbid spectrum conditions.

Methods and Procedures: We surveyed 702 adults aged 25+ years on a variety of EDS/HSD-related health topics, comparing individuals with EDS/HSD, autism, and unaffected controls.

Outcomes and Results: The autism group reported similar though less severe symptomology as the EDS/HSD group, especially in areas of immune/autonomic/endocrine dysregulation, connective tissue abnormalities (i.e., skin, bruising/bleeding), and chronic pain. EDS/HSD mothers with autistic children reported more immune symptoms than EDS/HSD mothers without, suggesting the maternal immune system could play a heritable role in these conditions (p = 0.0119).

Conclusions and Implications: These data suggest that EDS/HSD and autism share aspects of immune/autonomic/endocrine dysregulation, pain, and some tissue fragility, which is typically more severe in the former. This overlap, as well as documented comorbidity, suggests some forms of autism may be hereditary connective tissue disorders (HCTD).

Key words: hereditary connective tissue disorders, immune system, collagen, dysautonomia, mast cell activation disorders

Citation: Casanova, E. L., Sharp, J. L., Edelson, S. M., Kelly, D. P., Sokhadze, E. M., Casanova, M. F. Immune, Autonomic, and Endocrine Dysregulation in Autism and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders Versus Unaffected Controls. Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities. https://doi.org/10.26407/2019jrtdd.1.20

Full Text Article Ahead of Print

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DOAJ indexing criteria and how to apply: A guide for OA journals

If you publish open access journals, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) should be at the top of your indexing list. DOAJ indexing has long served as a mark of journal quality to scholars and their institutions, and today it’s increasingly becoming a core open access publishing standard. For example, Plan S requires journals to be indexed in the DOAJ as part of its implementation guidelines. Many open access publishing organizations also use DOAJ indexing as part of their admittance criteria, including the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), which now requires all journal publisher members to have at least one journal included in the DOAJ.

In addition to serving as proof of publication quality, having journals indexed in the DOAJ can help expand their reach. The DOAJ’s mission is to “increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally.” You can be sure that including journals in the DOAJ will help make them more discoverable online.

So what are the DOAJ’s indexing criteria? And how can you apply to add one or more journals to the DOAJ? We break down everything you need to know in this blog post.

Applying to the DOAJ is free and once you’ve met all of the indexing criteria you can easily submit an application!

DOAJ indexing criteria

Since it was launched in 2003, the DOAJ has indexed over 13,000 open access journals in its community-curated database. The index is open to OA journals in all subject areas and all languages, and includes a wide variety of publications in STEM, the humanities, and the social sciences. So ALL OA journals that meet the DOAJ indexing criteria can and should apply to be indexed in the DOAJ.

The DOAJ’s definition of “journals” is “scientific and scholarly periodicals that publish research or review papers in full text.” The DOAJ also states, “at least a third of the content should consist of peer reviewed original research and/or review papers.” And, to be admitted into the DOAJ, the full-text of a journal’s content must be openly accessible immediately upon publication—a requirement shared by Plan S.

The DOAJ aims to be the go-to place for searches for quality, peer-reviewed open access content and, as such, it has some pretty specific inclusion criteria. In good news, the DOAJ’s indexing criteria are all straightforward and relatively easy to meet!

In this section, we overview the DOAJ’s indexing criteria and what you need to know to fulfill them.

Required basic journal information

The first part of the DOAJ application is some “required basic journal information.” As the name suggests, these are foundational publication questions that every journal should be able to answer. The required basic journal information is:

  • Journal Title—be sure to spell out the complete journal title to match the title registered with all official publication identifiers (e.g. ISSN)
  • Journal website URL—you must have a journal website to be included in the DOAJ, so if you’re starting a journal you’ll need to have it set up first (you’ll also need to publish at least five research articles before applying as noted below)
  • Journal ISSN (print version)—note this is required but only if you have a print ISSN otherwise leave it blank
  • Journal ISSN (online version)—the DOAJ notes this cannot be the same as the P-ISSN, “write the EISSN with the hyphen – e.g. 1234-4321”
  • Publisher—this is the organization that officially publishes the journal, whether it’s a press, learned society, or academic non-profit
  • Name and email address for the main contact for the journal—Make sure this is someone who will be available and responsive if the DOAJ needs to reach out with questions/next steps now or in the future
  • The country where the journal’s publisher is based (i.e. carries out the majority of its publishing activities)
  • Whether the journal has article processing charges (APCs)—yes or no response
  • URL to the page where all APC information can be found—this is required, so even if a journal charges no fees you’ll need a statement explaining that somewhere on the website
  • Whether the journal has an article submission charge
  • URL to the page where all article submission fee information can be found—this is required, so even if a journal charges no fees you’ll need a statement explaining that somewhere on the website
  • The number of research and review articles that the journal published in the last calendar year—a journal must publish at least 5 research articles per year to stay in the DOAJ
  • URL where the number of articles the journal published in the last calendar year can be found—this can be a link to a journal issue published within the last year with at least 5 articles, or to a list of volumes/issues
  • Whether the journal has a waiver policy?—you’ll need to select “yes” or “no,” if the journal has no fees just select “no” (if “yes” you’ll need to provide a URL where waiver policy information can be found)
  • The digital archiving policy the journal uses (e.g. CLOCKSS, Portico, a national library)—while a digital archiving policy is not required by the DOAJ it is strongly recommended
  • URL where the journal’s digital archiving policy information can be found—this field is optional if you select “no policy in place”
  • Does the journal allow software/spiders to automatically crawl the journal content (also known as text mining)?—yes or no (allowing automatic crawling is not required for admittance into the DOAJ but is strongly recommended)
  • The article identifiers the journal uses (e.g. DOI, Handles)—while article identifiers are not required for indexing they are strongly recommended
  • Whether the journal will provide or intends to provide article-level metadata to the DOAJ (providing metadata is not required but is strongly recommended)
  • Whether the journal provides individual article download stats—yes or no (This is not required but if “yes” you will need to provide a URL where that information can be found)
  • The first calendar year in which a complete volume of the journal’s articles were provided online in full-text—if the journal flipped to OA use the year it officially became OA
  • Full-text article formats available (PDF, HTML, ePUB, XML, Other)
  • Up to 6 keyword(s) that best describe the subject area of the journal (comma delimited)
  • The language(s) that the full text of articles is published in

You’ll notice that for a few of the criteria above the DOAJ requires journals to not only provide a “yes” or “no” answer but to also include a URL to where information on the topic can be found on the journal website. For example, journals must be able to link to a page on their website that overviews publication fee information (APCs/submission fees). In instances where a URL is required for both “yes” and “no” responses, like for the questions about journal fees, the journal website should include transparent language on the subject, even if that is to say the journal does not charge any author-facing fees. This is part of the DOAJ’s commitment to publication transparency. All journals listed in the DOAJ are expected to follow the “Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing,” which the DOAJ co-created in partnership with The Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), OASPA, and the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME). We overview additional DOAJ publication transparency requirements in the next section.

It’s important to note that every journal applying to the DOAJ must have its own website, whether it’s a dedicated journal domain or a subdomain. Additionally, all of the journal’s “business information pages,” which the DOAJ defines as “the journal’s aims and scope, the editorial board, the instructions for authors, the description of the quality control system, the Open Access statement, the plagiarism policy, and the licensing terms),” must be hosted on the journal’s website, not a separate publisher website, so that visitors can quickly find all of the basic journal information they need.

Quick Note: If you use Scholastica’s OA publishing platform, we’ve put together a quick guide to how to ensure your Scholastica account is set up to meet the DOAJ indexing criteria and how to answer DOAJ application questions that you can find here.

Editorial process quality and transparency

In addition to the above “required basic journal information,” the DOAJ also requires journals to display that they have robust editorial processes and that all editorial process information is publicly available. The DOAJ asks for the following editorial process and quality information:

  • A URL to the Editorial Board page
  • The review process for papers submitted to the journal (editorial review, peer review, blind peer review, double-blind peer review, open peer review, none)—note, if “none” the journal will be rejected by the DOAJ
  • URL where information on the journal’s review process can be found
  • URL for the journal’s aims and scope
  • URL for the journal’s instructions for authors
  • Whether the journal has a policy for screening for plagiarism—yes or no (if “yes” you’ll need to provide a URL where that information can be found)
  • The average number of weeks between submission and publication

Of the above items, all but the plagiarism policy are required, and having a plagiarism policy is strongly recommended by the DOAJ. With regard to the Editorial Board, all journals must have an editor and an editorial board. Additionally, all journals must follow a peer review process, with the exception of arts and humanities journals, which may use a form of editorial review with only two editors and no editorial board.

Next in the DOAJ’s indexing criteria is copyright information. The DOAJ requires all journals to clearly state how open published content will be in an OA statement listed on the journal’s website. DOAJ applicants are required to provide a URL to their journal’s OA statement. This can usually be housed on the journal’s author information page or a journal policies page. You can find an example OA statement from the DOAJ here. Additionally, all journals applying to the DOAJ must provide information on:

  • Whether the journal embeds or displays licensing information in its articles—yes or no (this is not required but is strongly recommended)
  • Whether the journal allows reuse and remixing of content in accordance with a Creative Commons license or other type of license with similar conditions—the DOAJ requires journals to use a Creative Commons license or CC equivalent
  • The URL on your site where your journal’s license terms are stated—journals must include a clear copyright policy/statement on their website
  • Whether the journal allows readers to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of its articles and to use them for any other lawful purpose—yes or no (in order to be indexed in the DOAJ this must be a “yes”)
  • The deposit policy directory where the journal has a registered deposit policy (e.g. Sherpa/Romeo)—this is not a requirement for DOAJ indexing but it is strongly recommended
  • Whether the journal allows author(s) to hold copyright without restrictions—yes or no (if “yes” you’ll need to provide a URL where that information can be found)
  • Whether the journal allows the author(s) to retain publishing rights without restrictions—yes or no (if “yes” you’ll need to provide a URL where that information can be found)

Quick Note: For journals that use Scholastica’s OA publishing platform, we explain how you can easily set a default Creative Commons copyright license for all of the articles that you publish here. Once you set this up you can select “yes” for the DOAJ application question “Does the journal embed or display licensing information in its articles?”

How to apply to the DOAJ and what to expect

Once you know that your journal(s) meet all of the core DOAJ indexing criteria, you’re ready to apply. In this section, we overview the application and review process.

Applying to the DOAJ

Once you’ve fulfilled all of the DOAJ indexing criteria, the application process is easy. Just make sure all of the information you enter is accurate and that you don’t skip any of the required questions! Applications with incorrect or incomplete information are automatically rejected.

A couple of reminders: As noted above, remember that each journal must have its own website. Additionally, each article your journal publishes should have its own URL (not just an issue URL) so that the DOAJ and third-party databases can directly link to the journal articles.

It’s also important to note that you will have to submit a separate application for each of the OA journals you publish to prove that each journal meets the DOAJ criteria. So getting one journal indexed in the DOAJ doesn’t mean that any other journal you publish will automatically be admitted.

That said, once your journal(s) are admitted into the DOAJ, you will have the option to set up automatic content deposits either on your own via the DOAJ API or via a ready-to-go journal integration from a software provider—like Scholastica’s DOAJ integration, which automates all DOAJ article deposits for you. So the legwork for DOAJ indexing is all upfront unless you opt to manually upload articles (we don’t recommend this for time and metadata quality reasons).

You can access the DOAJ Journal Application form here.

On the DOAJ application, you’ll find a section on “qualifiers for the DOAJ Seal.” Any OA journal that meets the basic DOAJ criteria can be included in the index, but the DOAJ only awards official DOAJ Seals to journals that fulfill these qualifiers. In order to be awarded the DOAJ seal journals must:

  • Have an archival arrangement in place with an external party
  • Provide permanent identifiers in the papers published
  • Provide article-level metadata to DOAJ
  • Embed machine-readable CC licensing information in article-level metadata
  • Allow reuse and remixing of content in accordance with a CC BY, CC BY-SA or CC BY-NC license
  • Have a deposit policy registered in a deposit policy directory
  • Allow the author to hold the copyright without restrictions

A small percentage of journals in the DOAJ currently have the DOAJ Seal, so it’s an extra quality marker to aim for.

DOAJ indexing vs publisher membership

You may see on the DOAJ website that the DOAJ is a membership organization with three membership categories: Publisher, Ordinary Member, and Sponsor. It’s important to note that the publisher DOAJ membership and the journal indexing application are two separate things. DOAJ membership is a way to support the DOAJ, but becoming a member does not mean that all of your journals will automatically be admitted into the DOAJ. The DOAJ states: “Being a Publisher Member does not guarantee that your journals will be included in the DOAJ. All applications are treated equally from both members and non-members.” You must have at least one journal listed in the DOAJ in order to become a publisher member.

The DOAJ application review process: What to expect

Upon submitting your DOAJ application, you’ll be taken to a confirmation screen and you will also receive a confirmation email (save this for reference!). Your application will then be assessed by the DOAJ team—you’ll receive an email when your application has been assigned to a team member for the start of review. The DOAJ team hand reviews each application for accuracy and this can take some time. While you’re waiting for a decision, be sure to check ALL of your email folders including spam. The DOAJ requires that any email it sends be replied to in a month or less—you don’t want to be rejected because you forgot to check an email folder! You can also whitelist the DOAJ email address to tell your email provider that it is a trusted sender.

If your journal is accepted into the DOAJ, you’ll receive a confirmation email with next steps. If your application is rejected for some reason, don’t worry, you can always reapply! The DOAJ will send you details on why your application was rejected and they will usually allow you to reapply within six months.

General indexing advice for the DOAJ and beyond

Overall, for the DOAJ, and any index you apply to have a journal included in, you must be sure to clearly and accurately state all required information within the application and on your journal’s website. Indexing criteria is meant to ensure journal quality, and this should be something that both the index you’re applying to and any author visiting your journal can easily verify from your journal website.

Source: Scholastica

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WordPress 5.2.4 is available! Please update now

It is #OpenAccessWeek, and a number of players in the scholarly communications industry have used the occasion to produce their latest thinking and surveys, with some inevitable contradictions and confusion. Simon Linacre unpicks the spin to identify the key takeaways from the week.


It’s that time again, Open Access Week -or #openaccessweek, or #OAWeek19 or any number of hashtag-infected labels. The aim of this week for those in scholarly communications is to showcase what new products, surveys or insight they have to a market more focused than usual on all things Open Access.

There is a huge amount of content out there to wade through, as any Twitter search or scroll through press releases will confirm. A number have caught the eye, so here is your indispensable guide to what’s hot and what’s not in OA:

  • There are a number of new OA journal and monograph launches with new business models, in particular with IET Quantum Communication and MIT Press, which uses a subscription model to offset the cost of OA
  • There have been a number of publisher surveys over the years which show that authors are still to engage fully with OA, and this year is no exception. Taylor & Francis have conducted a large survey which shows that fewer than half of researchers believe everyone who needs access to their research has it, but just 18% have deposited a version of their article in a repository. Fewer than half would pay an APC to make their article OA, but two-thirds did not recognize any of the initiatives that support OA. Just 5% had even heard of Plan S
  • And yet, a report published by Delta Think shows that OA publications continue to increase, with articles published in Hybrid OA journals alongside paywall articles declining compared to pure OA articles. In other words, more and more OA articles continue to be published, but the hybrid element is on the decrease, hence the reports’ assertion that the scholarly communications market had already reached ‘peak hybrid’

At the end of the Delta Think report was perhaps the most intriguing question among all the other noise around OA. If the share of Hybrid OA is in decline, but there is an increase in so-called read-and-publish or transformative agreements between consortia and publishers, could Plan S actually revive Hybrid OA? The thinking is that as transformative agreements usually include waivers for OA articles in Hybrid journals, the increase in these deals could increase Hybrid OA articles, the very articles that Plan S mandates against.

And this puts large consortia in the spotlight, as in some cases a major funding agency signed up to Plan S may conflict with read-and-publish agreements increasing Hybrid OA outputs. It will be interesting to see how all this develops in the next OA Week in October 2020. The countdown starts here.

Source: Blog Cabells

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JRTDD indexed in EBSCO

Dear colleagues,

It is my pleasure to announce that JRTDD journal is already indexed in EBSCO databases.

About EBSCO

EBSCO is the leading provider of research databases, e-journals, magazine subscriptions, e-books and discovery service to libraries of all kinds. For more than 70 years, we’ve partnered with libraries to improve research with quality content and technology.

EBSCO Information Services is a division of EBSCO Industries, Inc., one of the largest privately held and family-owned companies in the United States. EBSCO Industries, Inc. has been in business since 1944. Starting out as a small subscription agency, EBSCO quickly became a pioneer in the library services industry.

Through vision, action and innovation, EBSCO invests in the library business to ensure the long-term growth of products, services and technologies for our customers.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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JRTDD indexed in prestigious ERIH PLUS

Dear readers,

I want to inform you that JRTDD is already indexed in prestigious ERIH PLUS.

The European Reference Index for the Humanities and the Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS) was created and developed by European researchers under the coordination of the Standing Committee for the Humanities (SCH) of the European Science Foundation (ESF). The ERIH lists, which initially covered only humanities disciplines, were first published by ESF in 2008, while revised lists were made available in 2011-2012. In 2014, responsibility for the maintenance and operation of ERIH was transferred to the NSD – Norwegian Centre for Research Data. The reference index at NSD is called ERIH PLUS in order to indicate that it has been extended to include the social sciences.

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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Peer Review Week 2019 in Macedonia

Dear readers,

Peer Review Week 2019 is already started from today 16 to 20 September 2019, with activities taking place online, on social media and at events across the globe.

This year’s theme of “Quality in peer review” will celebrate all initiatives aimed at improving peer review quality, and the peer review process. We want to hear everyone’s perspectives on quality in peer review, from early career researchers to senior academics, authors, reviewers, editors, medical charities, policymakers, funders, publishers and citizens.

In Macedonia, Macedonian Association of Medical Editors will organize event on September 19th. The event is entiled: PEERREVIEW – BASIC PRINCIPLE IN SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION will held in Macedonian Academy of Science and Arts from 13:00 to 15:00.

AGENDA

13:00 – 13:20 – Quality of peer review -basic process in publishing 
Prof. Dr. Gordana Ristovska
13:20 – 13:40 Prevention and elimination of plagiarism
Prof. Dr. Doncho Donev
13:40 – 14:00 Ethics of peerreview
Prof. Dr. Vladimir Trajkovski
14:00 – 15:00 Discussion and conclusions

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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JRTDD Vol. 2 Number 1 already has been published

09-September-2019
Dear colleagues and readers,
I would like to inform you that 1st issue of the 2nd volume of Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities is published online (September 8, 2019). A total number of 5 papers are published. Next Issue 2 of JRTDD for the 2019 year is expected to be published until December 31th, 2019.

Accessing JRTDD Online
To view a current article which appears online, please visit https://jrtdd.com/volume-2-number-1/
You, your colleagues, and students will be able to view articles (Full-Text PDF and Online First Full-text PDF) and have unlimited access to the journal (JRTDD is an open access, international, peer reviewed journal).
Citing Articles Using the Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
When citing articles from JRTDD, we encourage you to use article’s DOI in addition to traditional citation information. This is an industry standard, a link-resolving system that allows any link to remain “persistent” even if the location of the article changes at some point in the future. Hence, when you are quoting the link for an article, you should always quote the DOI rather than the URL of our home page.
Useful Online Features for Authors
Your registration in online submission (http://jrtdd.com/submit-your-manuscript/) will enable you with continuous information connected with JRTDD. We encourage you to share publications from JRTDD platform and online registration with your colleagues. You can feel free to share every publication on social media.
We invite you to the content of the JRTDD and we think that you will consider publishing with Journal for ReAttach Therapy and Developmental Diversities.

Call for papers for Vol.2, Issue 2 is open until October 31st.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to

  • ReAttach Therapy,
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders,
  • Neuropsychological Research,
  • Medical Aspects of Disability,
  • Special Education Research,
  • Rehabilitation Research,
  • Social Aspects of Disability,
  • Master theses and PhD theses in the field,
  • Book Reviews in the field.

If you have any questions or you face problems with paper submission, please feel free to contact us: journaljrtdd@gmail.com

Cheers,

JRTDD Editor-in-chief

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Role of Academic Publisher

1. Journal Owners

Owners and editors of medical journals share a common purpose, but they have different responsibilities, and sometimes those differences lead to conflicts.

It is the responsibility of medical journal owners to appoint and dismiss editors.

Owners should provide editors at the time of their appointment with a contract that clearly states their rights and duties, authority, the general terms of their appointment, and mechanisms for resolving conflict. The editor’s performance may be assessed using mutually agreed-upon measures, including but not necessarily limited to readership, manuscript submissions and handling times, and various journal metrics.

Owners should only dismiss editors for substantial reasons, such as scientific misconduct, disagreement with the long-term editorial direction of the journal, inadequate performance by agreed-upon performance metrics, or inappropriate behavior that is incompatible with a position of trust.

Appointments and dismissals should be based on evaluations by a panel of independent experts, rather than by a small number of executives of the owning organization. This is especially necessary in the case of dismissals because of the high value society places on freedom of speech within science and because it is often the responsibility of editors to challenge the status quo in ways that may conflict with the interests of the journal’s owners.

A medical journal should explicitly state its governance and relationship to a journal owner (eg, a sponsoring society).

2. Editorial Freedom

The ICMJE adopts the World Association of Medical Editors’ definition of editorial freedom, which holds that editors-in-chief have full authority over the entire editorial content of their journal and the timing of publication of that content. Journal owners should not interfere in the evaluation, selection, scheduling, or editing of individual articles either directly or by creating an environment that strongly influences decisions. Editors should base editorial decisions on the validity of the work and its importance to the journal’s readers, not on the commercial implications for the journal, and editors should be free to express critical but responsible views about all aspects of medicine without fear of retribution, even if these views conflict with the commercial goals of the publisher.

Editors-in-chief should also have the final say in decisions about which advertisements or sponsored content, including supplements, the journal will and will not carry, and they should have final say in use of the journal brand and in overall policy regarding commercial use of journal content.

Journals are encouraged to establish an independent editorial advisory board to help the editor establish and maintain editorial policy. Editors should seek to engage a broad and diverse array of authors, reviewers, editorial staff, editorial board members, and readers. To support editorial decisions and potentially controversial expressions of opinion, owners should ensure that appropriate insurance is obtained in the event of legal action against the editors, and should ensure that legal advice is available when necessary.

If legal problems arise, the editor should inform their legal adviser and their owner and/or publisher as soon as possible. Editors should defend the confidentiality of authors and peer-reviewers (names and reviewer comments) in accordance with ICMJE policy (see Section II C.2.a). Editors should take all reasonable steps to check the facts in journal commentary, including that in news sections and social media postings, and should ensure that staff working for the journal adhere to best journalistic practices including contemporaneous note-taking and seeking a response from all parties when possible before publication. Such practices in support of truth and public interest may be particularly relevant in defense against legal allegations of libel.

To secure editorial freedom in practice, the editor should have direct access to the highest level of ownership, not to a delegated manager or administrative officer.

Editors and editors’ organizations are obliged to support the concept of editorial freedom and to draw major transgressions of such freedom to the attention of the international medical, academic, and lay communities.

Source: http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/roles-and-responsibilities/journal-owners-and-editorial-freedom.html

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